News Feeds (RSS) http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=466 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/10/23/preventing-reunification/ Other Preventing Reunification The title for this post implies that we should prevent reunification.  Shouldn’t we instead promote it?  Well, yes, but reunification would not be necessary if children were not removed from their families.  Reunification is also more difficult to achieve than helping families stay together. How can we prevent unnecessary out-of-home placement?  Let’s begin with a &#8230; Tue, 23 Oct 2018 14:05:50 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/10/23/preventing-reunification/#respond admin <p>The title for this post implies that we should prevent reunification.  Shouldn’t we instead promote it?  Well, yes, but reunification would not be necessary if children were not removed from their families.  Reunification is also more difficult to achieve than helping families stay together. How can we prevent unnecessary out-of-home placement?  Let’s begin with a call to action by Jerry Milner, Associate Commissioner, Children’s Bureau:</p> <p>“The passage of the FFPSA (Family First Prevention Services Act) provides an opportunity and an impetus to re-examine fundamentally the child welfare system in the United States, and how it can function better to reverse harmful trends of increased entries of children into the child protection and foster care programs, family separations, and trauma to children and their parents. We strongly encourage you to use this time as an opportunity to ensure that the programs and systems you operate reflect a commitment to the integrity of the parent-child relationship and importance of preventing the trauma of unnecessary family separation. The CB believes reaching children and families sooner through prevention is the key to avoiding unnecessary trauma, disrupting intergenerational cycles of maltreatment, and achieving better outcomes for children and families.”</p> <p>Now let’s look at some ways to prevent placement.  One prevention practice is “blind removal meetings.”  Due to the disproportionate number of black children placed in foster care, two counties in New York hold pre-placement meetings in which personal and demographic information is removed from the paperwork.  These case review meetings have decreased removals of black children from 57% to 42%.</p> <p>For more information on blind removal meetings visit: <a href="https://www.nassaucountyny.gov/DocumentCenter/View/18095" rel="nofollow">https://www.nassaucountyny.gov/DocumentCenter/View/18095</a> (p. 17)</p> <p>The state of North Dakota is embarking on the Family Centered Engagement Initiative.  The Initiative brings together parents/caregivers, extended family members, children, service providers, child welfare professionals, juvenile court staff, community partners and others involved in a child’s life.  The purpose is to create an action plan with a family to keep their child out of foster care and a safety plan prioritizing kinship care if the child must be removed.  Families are engaged earlier in decision making and their strengths and need for services identified and addressed.</p> <p>For more information visit <a href="https://www.thevillagefamily.org/content/family-centered-engagement" rel="nofollow">https://www.thevillagefamily.org/content/family-centered-engagement</a></p> <p>Home Visitation has become a nationwide initiative. The highest rating for Evidence-Based Practice in home visitation goes to the Nurse-Family Partnership.   Specially trained nurses regularly visit young, first-time moms-to-be, starting early in the pregnancy, and continuing through the child’s second birthday.  It is the most effective intervention to prevent child abuse and neglect.</p> <p>For more information on the research on the Nurse-Family Partnership visit <a href="https://evidencebasedprograms.org/programs/nurse-family-partnership/" rel="nofollow">https://evidencebasedprograms.org/programs/nurse-family-partnership/</a></p> <p>There is a bonus to the home visiting program if fathers are involved<em>.  </em><em>Families whose fathers participated in at least one home visit were enrolled nearly seven months longer than families whose fathers did not participate in any home visits.  </em><a href="https://childandfamilyresearch.utexas.edu/retaining-families-home-visiting-programs-promoting-father-participation" rel="nofollow">https://childandfamilyresearch.utexas.edu/retaining-families-home-visiting-programs-promoting-father-participation</a></p> <p>The federal Administration for Children and Families (ACF) has just issued a memo to encourage all human services agencies to prioritize father engagement as a critical factor in strengthening families.  The memo lists the benefits of father involvement in the lives of children including family stability and social and emotional well-being.</p> <p>To view the memo visit <a href="https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/assets/acffatherhoodim_final.pdf" rel="nofollow">https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/assets/acffatherhoodim_final.pdf</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens</p> <p>NFPN Executive Director</p> <p><em> </em></p> <p><em> </em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/10/23/preventing-reunification/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2018-10-23 14:05 +00:00 2018-10-23 07:05 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=464 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/09/20/fall-resources/ Other Fall Resources The fall season brings a new fiscal year for the federal government and many states. This means agencies are starting new programs and looking for information and resources. Let’s get started! Assessment Tools At the beginning and end of the fiscal and calendar years, NFPN sees an increase in customers wanting the assessment tools.  That’s &#8230; Thu, 20 Sep 2018 14:32:50 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/09/20/fall-resources/#respond admin <p>The fall season brings a new fiscal year for the federal government and many states. This means agencies are starting new programs and looking for information and resources. Let’s get started!</p> <p><strong>Assessment Tools</strong></p> <p>At the beginning and end of the fiscal and calendar years, NFPN sees an increase in customers wanting the assessment tools.  That’s a good indicator agencies are using the tools with new and expanded programs.  Here is some information to consider when looking for an assessment tool:</p> <ul> <li>Choose only reliable and valid assessment tools that have a proven track record and that include training, technical assistance, and ongoing research. Otherwise your agency is not only wasting time and money but the families you want to help will have poor outcomes.</li> <li>Policy makers, administrators, and funders want to see reports that show how quality assessments are helping families. The new web database for the NCFAS tools provides report features that can be quickly generated and shared and that include data on both individual and aggregate families.</li> <li>All federal programs and many state programs require trauma-informed practice. NFPN’s Trauma/Post-Trauma Well-Being scale fits the bill as an assessment tool that measures trauma indicators and post-trauma healing.  It’s a comprehensive yet inexpensive tool for initiating trauma-informed practice.</li> <li>There has been a growing increase in the use of assessment tools by home visiting programs and schools. The NCFAS-G is the recommended tool for this use, and NFPN has a new training case example for school-based programs.</li> </ul> <p>For information on all of the assessment tools visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools</a></p> <p>NFPN has arranged for onsite training on the assessment tools for our customers in Australia and Chile.  Contact NFPN for more details.<strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Onsite Training</strong></p> <p>NFPN is now offering an array of onsite training on a variety of topics including Motivational Interviewing, Assessment/Treatment of substance use disorders, Relapse Prevention, Clinical Supervision, Trauma-Informed Care, and many more.</p> <p>Please contact NFPN to see how we can meet your training needs: <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a>, 888-498-9047.</p> <p><strong>Father Involvement</strong></p> <p>The Fathers and Families Center in Indianapolis celebrates its 25<sup>th</sup> anniversary this year. The Center provides services for fathers on parenting, education, and work skills as well as co-parenting classes and couples counseling for both moms and dads.  For more information on this high-quality center visit <a href="https://www.fatherhood.gov/sites/default/files/Resource%20Files/approved_spotlight_fathers_and_families_center_8-17-18_508.pdf">https://www.fatherhood.gov/sites/default/files/Resource%20Files/approved_spotlight_fathers_and_families_center_8-17-18_508.pdf</a></p> <p>The Safe and Together Institute has a paper on being father-inclusive in child welfare cases that involve domestic violence.  The Institute is a national leader in balancing the need to work with fathers involved in domestic violence while protecting mothers and children.  Anyone working with these families should read this article: <a href="https://safeandtogetherinstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/OH_FYLAW_Working-with-Men-as-Parents-Brief_July-2018.pdf" rel="nofollow">https://safeandtogetherinstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/OH_FYLAW_Working-with-Men-as-Parents-Brief_July-2018.pdf</a></p> <p>James McHale, University of South Florida, is conducting research on father involvement and domestic violence.  In a current study, only 15% of the families were considered unsafe for participation.  For more information visit <a href="http://www.usfsp.edu/family-study-center/">http://www.usfsp.edu/family-study-center/</a></p> <p><strong>Teen Drug Use</strong></p> <p>Teens are becoming addicted to a non-opioid drug, see file:///C:/Users/User/Documents/Opioids&#8211;Xanax.html</p> <p>Free classroom lessons/resources for K-12 to prevent drug misuse are available here: <a href="https://www.operationprevention.com/classroom">https://www.operationprevention.com/classroom</a></p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens</p> <p>NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/09/20/fall-resources/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2018-09-20 14:32 +00:00 2018-09-20 07:32 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=462 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/08/23/kinship-policies-and-resources/ Other Kinship Policies and Resources With the increase in the number of children placed in foster care, kinship placement has become a critical factor.  Placement with kin results in better outcomes for children with greater placement stability and safety. About 32% of children in the child welfare system are living with a relative.  Placement with relatives has increased by approximately &#8230; Thu, 23 Aug 2018 14:02:04 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/08/23/kinship-policies-and-resources/#respond admin <p>With the increase in the number of children placed in foster care, kinship placement has become a critical factor.  Placement with kin results in better outcomes for children with greater placement stability and safety. About 32% of children in the child welfare system are living with a relative.  Placement with relatives has increased by approximately one percentage point each year from 2009-2017.</p> <p>In order to create a “kin first culture” several organizations developed a wikiHow for kinship care with the following seven steps:</p> <p>Step 1 &#8211; Lead with a kin first philosophy</p> <p>Step 2 &#8211; Develop written policies and protocols that reflect equity for children with kin and recognize their unique circumstances</p> <p>Step 3 &#8211; Identify and engage kin for children at every step</p> <p>Step 4 &#8211; Create a sense of urgency for making the first placement a kin placement​</p> <p>Step 5 &#8211; Make licensing kin a priority​</p> <p>Step 6 &#8211; Support permanent families for children</p> <p>Step 7 &#8211; Create a strong community network to support kin families</p> <p>Each step includes examples from states that have implemented them.  To view the wikiHow visi<strong>t </strong><a href="http://www.grandfamilies.org/wikiHow-for-Kinship-Foster-Care">http://www.grandfamilies.org/wikiHow-for-Kinship-Foster-Care</a>.</p> <p>Children whose families are involved in abuse and neglect often experience trauma. Although this trauma affects both the child and kin family, the kin placement also provides the best antidote to trauma: a positive, supporting relationship with a loving adult. Children placed with relatives have fewer school changes, better behavioral and mental health outcomes, and are more likely to report that they “always feel loved.”</p> <p>Generations United has prepared an excellent report on trauma and the positive effects of kin placement: <a href="https://www.gu.org/app/uploads/2018/05/Grandfamilies-Report-SOGF-2017.pdf">https://www.gu.org/app/uploads/2018/05/Grandfamilies-Report-SOGF-2017.pdf</a></p> <p>Kin caregivers provide better outcomes for children along with a priceless relationship but there is a cost.  Kin often have lower income, less access to resources, and poorer health than non-kin caregivers.  The federal government has funded kinship navigator programs to connect grandparents and other relatives who take primary responsibility for the care of children with resources.  In the past, these navigator programs were funded through grants and about half the states had navigator programs.  The Family First Prevention Services Act provided seed funding, effective October 1, for all states to develop a navigator program. The dollar amount ranges from $206,630 for Wyoming to just over $1 million for California. Almost all states have submitted a request form to receive the funding.</p> <p>There is additional funding available for kin and kinship navigator programs through other portions of the Family First legislation. To help unravel the complicated guidelines for funding, Jennifer Miller, an expert on kin care from Child Focus, provided the following information:</p> <p>To receive ongoing funding for kinship navigator programs, states will need to establish their program as evidence-based practice.  However, the challenge is that there are few navigator programs currently meeting EBP standards.  Efforts are underway to identify and establish such programs.</p> <p>Kin are also eligible to receive direct services through Family First funding.  The most likely services they will receive are parenting skills training and mental health prevention and treatment services.</p> <p>For more information on kinship navigator programs and resources visit <a href="http://www.grandfamilies.org/Resources/Kinship-Navigator-Programs">http://www.grandfamilies.org/Resources/Kinship-Navigator-Programs</a>.</p> <p>For information on Kinship Care—Best Practice, visit the Preserving Families Blog at <a href="https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/2018/08/23/kinship-care-best-practice/">https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/2018/08/23/kinship-care-best-practice/</a></p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens</p> <p>NFPN Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/08/23/kinship-policies-and-resources/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2018-08-23 14:02 +00:00 2018-08-23 07:02 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=460 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/07/23/problem-solving-courts/ Other Problem-Solving Courts In recent years, Problem-Solving Courts, also referred to as Specialty Courts, have been established to deal with the underlying problems that contribute to criminal behavior.  We’re going to take a closer look today at two of these courts. The following information on Family Drug Courts (in quotes) and additional information is from an Office of &#8230; Mon, 23 Jul 2018 13:56:35 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/07/23/problem-solving-courts/#respond admin <p>In recent years, Problem-Solving Courts, also referred to as Specialty Courts, have been established to deal with the underlying problems that contribute to criminal behavior.  We’re going to take a closer look today at two of these courts.</p> <p>The following information on Family Drug Courts (in quotes) and additional information is from an Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention document: <a href="https://www.ojjdp.gov/mpg/litreviews/Family_Drug_Courts.pdf">https://www.ojjdp.gov/mpg/litreviews/Family_Drug_Courts.pdf</a></p> <p>“<strong>Family Drug Courts</strong> (FDCs) handle cases of child abuse and neglect that involve substance use by the child’s parents or guardians (Brook et al. 2015; Chuang et al. 2012). The overall goal of FDCs is to reduce child maltreatment by treating parents’ underlying substance use disorders through a coordinated and collaborative approach that involves a multitude of agencies and professionals such as the court system, child protective services (CPS), substance use treatment providers, and the attorneys involved in the case (Pach 2008; Gifford et al.).</p> <p>FDCs identify and assess parents’ needs, provide access to treatment, attempt to remove barriers that may impact successful completion of treatment (such as helping parents to develop skills to achieve recovery), and provide ongoing monitoring of parental compliance (Pach 2008).  Children’s needs are simultaneously addressed, as the likelihood of reunification is increased when family and children’s services are provided at a high level in substance use treatment (Grella et al. 2009).</p> <p>There have been fewer evaluation studies (less than 20) conducted on the effectiveness of FDCs, compared with the number of studies (more than 50) of adult drug courts (Gifford et al. 2014; van Wormer and Hsieh 2016).  A descriptive study of the Children Affected by Methamphetamine (CAM) grant program found that when child-focused services with adult recovery-support services were offered in the FDC setting, parental substance use was reduced, parents’ participation in substance use disorder treatment was improved, children were subjected to less neglect and abuse, and out-of-home placements were shorter (Rodi et al. 2015).”</p> <p>The federal Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) administers the <strong>Mental Health Courts</strong> Program.</p> <p>The following information (in quotes) on Mental Health Courts and additional information is available on the BJA Website: <a href="https://www.bja.gov/ProgramDetails.aspx?Program_ID=68">https://www.bja.gov/ProgramDetails.aspx?Program_ID=68</a></p> <p>“Mental health courts typically involve judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, and other court personnel who have expressed an interest in or possess particular mental health expertise. The courts generally deal with nonviolent offenders who have been diagnosed with a mental illness or co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders. Today, more than 150 of these courts exist, and more are being planned.</p> <p>The goal of BJA&#8217;s Mental Health Court grant program is to decrease the frequency of clients&#8217; contacts with the criminal justice system by providing courts with resources to improve clients&#8217; social functioning and link them to employment, housing, treatment, and support services.</p> <p>BJA funds projects that emphasize:</p> <ul> <li>Continuing judicial supervision—including periodic review—over preliminarily qualified offenders with mental illness or co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse disorders who are charged with misdemeanors and/or nonviolent offenses.</li> <li>Specialized training of criminal justice personnel to identify and address the unique needs of offenders who are mentally ill or intellectually disabled.</li> <li>Voluntary outpatient or inpatient mental health treatment, in the least restrictive manner appropriate as determined by the court, that carries with it the possibility of dismissal of charges or reduced sentencing on successful completion of treatment.</li> <li>Centralized case management and the coordination of all mental health treatment plans and social services, including life skills training, placement, health care, and relapse prevention.”</li> </ul> <p>A research study by the Urban Institute of two long-standing Mental Health Courts in Brooklyn and Bronx, New York, found that mental health court participants are significantly less likely to recidivate than similar offenders with mental illness who experience business-as-usual court processing.</p> <p>For a look at Safe Babies Court Teams, visit the Preserving Families Blog at <a href="https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/2018/07/23/safe-babies-court-teams/">https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/2018/07/23/safe-babies-court-teams/</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/07/23/problem-solving-courts/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2018-07-23 13:56 +00:00 2018-07-23 06:56 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=457 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/06/11/fathers-and-reunification/ Other Fathers and Reunification Jerry Milner, Associate Commissioner at the Children&#8217;s Bureau, introduces two  events observed in June that he believes are closely related: &#8220;The month of June provides two causes for celebration in the child welfare world, Father&#8217;s Day and National Reunification Month. Both allow us the opportunity to reflect on the importance of families. Both also prompt &#8230; Mon, 11 Jun 2018 16:03:02 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/06/11/fathers-and-reunification/#respond admin <p>Jerry Milner, Associate Commissioner at the Children&#8217;s Bureau, introduces two  events observed in June that he believes are closely related:</p> <p>&#8220;The month of June provides two causes for celebration in the child welfare world, Father&#8217;s Day and National Reunification Month. Both allow us the opportunity to reflect on the importance of families. Both also prompt us to redouble our efforts to strengthen families and do everything we can as a system and in our communities to respect and nurture the integrity of the parent-child relationship.</p> <p>Reunification Month is a time to celebrate resiliency, hard work, and the power of families to heal. It is a time to acknowledge perseverance and commit to seeking positive outcomes for families separated through foster care. Parents that achieve reunification often have overcome great odds—and too often without adequate support. Their achievement is a demonstration of parental love and its ability to propel change.&#8221;</p> <p>Well said!  What follows are some of the specific ways that father involvement and reunification are linked.  Children in single parent households are at greater risk of child abuse and neglect. Research shows that when fathers are involved:</p> <ul> <li>Children have shorter lengths of stay in foster care, fewer placement episodes, and greater stability in foster care</li> <li>Children are more likely to be reunified</li> <li>Reunifications are more durable</li> </ul> <p>The father’s family can also play a role in reunification. NFPN’s early research on father involvement demonstrated that social workers who received training and assistance were more likely to involve the father’s family with the child and in the case plan.  Winokur et al. (2014) report that children placed with kin have more placement stability and higher rates of behavioral and emotional well-being than children placed with unrelated caregivers.</p> <p>Involving the father and the father’s family needs to begin early in the intervention.  In NFPN’s research study, social workers’ efforts to involve fathers tended to taper off after six months.  In another study, the worker established either a trusting working relationship or no working relationship with the parent(s) within three weeks of the referral.</p> <p>Coakley, Kelley, &amp; Bartlett (2014) provide some steps for engaging fathers:</p> <p>1.Use diligent efforts to identify, find, communicate with, and engage fathers</p> <p>2. Offer fathers the same services and supports that mothers receive, and treat them equally</p> <p>3.Address father-specific needs (community services, father support groups, counseling, housing and employment services, etc.)</p> <p>4.Ensure a constructive worker-father relationship</p> <p>During this month of June, there are many resources to choose from on both father involvement and reunification.  Here are just a few:</p> <p>The Birth Parent National Network is sponsoring a Reunification webinar on June 28, featuring Mimi Laver with the American Bar Association.  You can register for the webinar at <a href="https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7399725737582547459">https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7399725737582547459</a><u>.</u></p> <p>A parents’ handbook for reunification is available at <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/reunification/">https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/reunification/</a></p> <p>A research article on father engagement and involvement can be found here: <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4389279/">https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4389279/</a></p> <p>A report from the Fatherhood Research and Practice Network on state approaches to including fathers in programs and practices: <a href="http://www.frpn.org/asset/frpn-research-brief-state-approaches-including-fathers-in-programs-and-policies-dealing">http://www.frpn.org/asset/frpn-research-brief-state-approaches-including-fathers-in-programs-and-policies-dealing</a></p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/06/11/fathers-and-reunification/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2018-06-11 16:03 +00:00 2018-06-11 09:03 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=455 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/05/22/putting-together-an-opioid-conference/ Other Putting Together an Opioid Conference The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) helped coordinate a conference on opioids on May 3. There is no more vital topic of discussion right now&#8211;here are some suggestions for putting together a conference on opioids: Collaborate with a wide variety of agencies. The opioid issue involves a broad spectrum of agencies.  Our conference collaborative included &#8230; Tue, 22 May 2018 13:52:04 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/05/22/putting-together-an-opioid-conference/#respond admin <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) helped coordinate a conference on opioids on May 3. There is no more vital topic of discussion right now&#8211;here are some suggestions for putting together a conference on opioids:</p> <ol> <li>Collaborate with a wide variety of agencies. The opioid issue involves a broad spectrum of agencies.  Our conference collaborative included family treatment court (drug court), a state child welfare agency, a county child welfare agency, treatment providers, and national organizations.</li> <li>Select a keynote speaker with vast knowledge of opioids at the national, state, and local level. It’s critical for participants to have information that includes extent of use, how opioids work, the high rate of overdose and available overdose reversal measures, and best practice in treatment.</li> <li>Provide training on interventions. Start first with addressing differences in perception and approach of the workforce such as child welfare social workers compared to drug treatment providers. Parenting capacity is critical in addressing substance use of parents.  Therapeutic interventions (Motivational Interviewing, TF-CBT, etc.) require intensive training so provide introductory overviews.  More basic interventions that can be quickly learned and applied include Trauma Systems Therapy and Mental Health First Aid.</li> <li>Family treatment/drug courts are highly effective and an essential component of addressing the opioid epidemic. A drug court judge and drug court graduate are valuable and highly valued speakers at an opioid conference.</li> <li>Don’t overlook the informal support system. Opioid users need a lot of support from family and other informal support systems such as churches, AA, Narcotics Anonymous, etc.  At our conference the mother of a drug court graduate shared how she supported her daughter in overcoming substance use.  The mother received a standing ovation from participants.</li> </ol> <p>Here are some lessons learned from the opioid conference:</p> <ol> <li>Participants loved the variety of presenters and topics.</li> <li>The one-day conference was too short for the amount of material presented so plan follow-up training.</li> <li>The PowerPoint presentations and supplemental materials can be put on a flash drive for easy access and additional training.</li> <li>On the evaluation forms, ask participants 3 things they learned and 1 way they will change practice after the conference = priceless feedback.</li> <li>The conference received the highest ratings by participants of any that NFPN has been involved in. There’s a big interest in opioids!</li> </ol> <p>Here are additional resources:</p> <p>NFPN offers a video training on substance use.  Pricing starts at $275.</p> <p>NFPN has trainers (board members) with expertise in parenting capacity and skills, motivational interviewing, trauma treatment, and depression.</p> <p>For all questions and more information about resources, training, and putting together an opioid conference, please contact Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director, <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a>, phone 888-498-9047.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To view “10 Things I learned at the Opioid Conference,” visit the Preserving Families Blog at <a href="https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/22/10-things-i-learned-at-the-opioid-conference/">https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/22/10-things-i-learned-at-the-opioid-conference/</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/05/22/putting-together-an-opioid-conference/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2018-05-22 13:52 +00:00 2018-05-22 06:52 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=453 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/04/10/reunification/ Other Reunification When children are removed from their families, the most common goal is to reunify the family and about half of the children removed are actually reunified with their families.  What can be done to improve this outcome so that more children can safely return home? The Child Welfare Information Gateway addressed the issue of reunification &#8230; Tue, 10 Apr 2018 13:41:50 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/04/10/reunification/#respond admin <p>When children are removed from their families, the most common goal is to reunify the family and about half of the children removed are actually reunified with their families.  What can be done to improve this outcome so that more children can safely return home?</p> <p>The Child Welfare Information Gateway addressed the issue of reunification in a recent publication.  Gateway reported these factors result in children being less likely to reunify:</p> <ul> <li>Being placed in kinship care</li> <li>Spending longer time in care or experiencing more placements</li> <li>Being African-American</li> <li>Having health, mental health, or behavioral problems (child)</li> <li>Coming from a single-parent family</li> <li>Receiving an initial placement in a group home or emergency shelter</li> </ul> <p>Gateway’s best practice for reunifying families include the following:</p> <p><strong>Comprehensive Family Assessment: </strong> Assessment has been linked to positive outcomes including increased reunification and reductions in maltreatment reoccurrence.  The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) has one of the few reliable and valid family assessment tools for reunification.</p> <p>For information on the NCFAS-G+R family assessment tool and training visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/ncfas-gr-training-package">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/ncfas-gr-training-package</a></p> <p><strong>Intensive Family Reunification Services</strong>:  Various studies show that intensive services for reunifying families are effective.  NFPN’s largest reunification study found that various factors such as race, marital status, employment, substance abuse, mental health, and domestic violence did not hinder reunifying families through intensive services.  Factors that had a positive effect on the durability of the reunification were concrete services, step-down services, and father involvement.</p> <p>To read the full research article visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/reunification/reunification-research">http://www.nfpn.org/reunification/reunification-research</a></p> <p>NFPN has a reunification model that has been used by several states in developing their model of intensive services.</p> <p>To view the reunification model visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/reunification/reunification-model">http://www.nfpn.org/reunification/reunification-model</a></p> <p><strong>Frequent and regular visits of parents with children:  </strong>Children who have regular visits with their families are more likely to reunify.  Hess and Proch (1993) portray visits as the heart of reunification.  Parent/child visits are important because:</p> <ul> <li>Visiting maintains family relationships: only if relationships are maintained will the family be reunited.</li> <li>Visiting empowers and informs parents: during visits, parents are reassured about their ability to act as parents and to provide at least some care for their children. Visits also allow parents to identify strengths and weaknesses as parents. Visiting provides both parents and children an opportunity to practice new behaviors and skills.</li> <li>Visiting enhances children’s wellbeing: the trauma of a child’s separation from the parent and feelings of abandonment are decreased, and the improved psychological health of the child enhances the child’s developmental progress.</li> <li>Visiting provides a transition to home: by observing family interactions during visits caseworkers can identify issues that must be resolved prior to reunification, determine the family’s progress, address the timing and sequence for returning children, and identify issues that must continue to be addressed following reunification.</li> </ul> <p>To read more about parent/child visits, especially focusing on father-child visits see <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/father-child-visits">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/father-child-visits</a></p> <p><strong>Foster Parent Support of Birth Parents: </strong>Foster parents can have a big impact on reunification by supporting the birth parents.  For an excellent tip sheet on how foster parents can help, visit <a href="https://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/child_law/ParentRep/Reunification_Tip_Sheet.authcheckdam.pdf?utm_source=Professionals&amp;utm_campaign=6cd0d7df44-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_E-Notes_September_2017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_term=0_9bab4b66b7-6cd0d7df44-292527401">https://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/child_law/ParentRep/Reunification_Tip_Sheet.authcheckdam.pdf?utm_source=Professionals&amp;utm_campaign=6cd0d7df44-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_E-Notes_September_2017&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_term=0_9bab4b66b7-6cd0d7df44-292527401</a></p> <p>To view the entire Gateway document visit: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/supporting-successful-reunifications/">https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/supporting-successful-reunifications/</a></p> <p>For  information on reunification models, visit the Preserving Families Blog at <a href="https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/2018/04/10/reunification-models/">https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/2018/04/10/reunification-models/</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/04/10/reunification/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2018-04-10 13:41 +00:00 2018-04-10 06:41 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=450 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/03/20/engaging-fathers/ Other Engaging Fathers The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) has provided resources, curricula, and training on father involvement since 2000.  The Basic Fatherhood Training Curriculum was developed as part of a demonstration project in which child welfare social workers received training and assistance to engage fathers in their children’s lives.  The project was successful and was one of &#8230; Tue, 20 Mar 2018 13:46:27 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/03/20/engaging-fathers/#respond admin <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) has provided resources, curricula, and training on father involvement since 2000.  The Basic Fatherhood Training Curriculum was developed as part of a demonstration project in which child welfare social workers received training and assistance to engage fathers in their children’s lives.  The project was successful and was one of the first to show that training practitioners is a key component of engaging fathers.</p> <p>Additional studies over the past two decades show that early engagement of fathers is critical to engaging and involving them in their children’s lives. Early engagement is also important because the practitioner’s efforts and the father’s involvement tend to peak within about six months.</p> <p>To assist practitioners with early engagement of fathers, the following is a six-week plan for engagement of non-residential fathers whose children are involved in the child welfare system:</p> <p><strong>Week 1:  </strong></p> <p>Identify the father of the child</p> <p>Obtain a physical address for the father</p> <p>Share with the mother how a father can be a resource</p> <p>Contact the father: schedule face-to-face meeting</p> <p><strong>Week 2: </strong></p> <p>Complete assessment form on father’s current involvement</p> <p>Explore with father how he can be a resource to the child</p> <p>If father is a limited resource, ask if his extended family could be a resource for the child</p> <p>Identify services and resources that the father needs</p> <p>Arrange a visit between the father and child</p> <p><strong>Week 3:      </strong></p> <p>Provide information and discuss with the father the developmental stage/needs of the child</p> <p>Suggest activities that the father and child can do together</p> <p>Discuss with the mother what the father’s involvement with the child can do to help her                       (child care, co-parenting, respite)</p> <p>Connect both parents to services and resources that include addressing their co-parenting                     roles</p> <p>Include father in the case plan</p> <p><strong>Week 4:    </strong></p> <p>Assist the father with scheduling a visit to the child’s school (pre-school, nursery)</p> <p>Discuss with the father how services and resources are helping him to become more                            involved in the child’s life</p> <p>Ask the child (if appropriate age) what his father’s involvement means to the child</p> <p><strong>Week 5:     </strong></p> <p>Discuss with each parent (or arrange a meeting with the father and mother) their view of                      the father’s involvement, assist with setting up a schedule for the father’s time with the                        child, and help establish methods/frequency of communication between the parents</p> <p>Explore with the father what other services and resources are needed for him to maintain                     involvement in the child’s life</p> <p><strong>Week 6:    </strong></p> <p>Complete the assessment form on father involvement to determine progress and areas still                    needing improvement</p> <p>Connect the father to any additional needed services</p> <p>Explain to the father the importance of and benefits to the child of the father’s ongoing                        and permanent involvement</p> <p>For information on the Basic Fatherhood Training Curriculum visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/basic-training-package">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/basic-training-package</a></p> <p>For additional resources on father involvement visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement</a></p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/03/20/engaging-fathers/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2018-03-20 13:46 +00:00 2018-03-20 06:46 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=448 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/02/27/aces-and-trauma-informed-care/ Other ACEs and Trauma-Informed Care ACEs are adverse childhood experiences that may have lasting, negative effects on health and well-being both in childhood and in adult life. While there is currently not a definitive list of ACEs, the original list included exposure to child abuse, substance abuse, mental illness and suicide, incarceration, and violence. Recent additions included in a study &#8230; Tue, 27 Feb 2018 15:39:47 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/02/27/aces-and-trauma-informed-care/#respond admin <p>ACEs are adverse childhood experiences that may have lasting, negative effects on health and well-being both in childhood and in adult life.</p> <p>While there is currently not a definitive list of ACEs, the original list included exposure to child abuse, substance abuse, mental illness and suicide, incarceration, and violence. Recent additions included in a study of ACEs conducted by Child Trends are parental separation/divorce, death of parent, and economic hardship. The following information summarizes the study and there is a link to the study at the end of this post.</p> <p>Key findings:</p> <ul> <li>Economic hardship and parental separation/divorce are the most common ACEs reported nationally</li> <li>45% of children in the U.S. have experienced at least one ACE</li> <li>61% of black children, 51% of Hispanic children, 40% of white children, and 23% of Asian children have experienced at least one ACE</li> <li>One in nine children has experienced three or more ACEs</li> </ul> <p>ACEs can result in toxic levels of stress hormones that alter normal mental and physical development.  This can lead to alcoholism, drug abuse, depression, suicide, poor physical health, lower educational attainment, unemployment, and poverty. Not all children who experience ACEs have negative outcomes but multiple ACEs substantially increase the risk of negative outcomes.</p> <p>Protective factors can reduce negative outcomes.  The most significant protective factor is a positive, supportive relationship with one or more adults.  Children who experience ACEs but who can manage their emotions have more positive outcomes.  Resilience can be cultivated through self-care routines and through strengthening social and emotional skills such as empathy, self-regulation, and self-efficacy.</p> <p>An understanding of ACEs has been accompanied by an increase in the development and application of trauma-informed care.  Trauma-informed care includes a variety of approaches that acknowledge the impact of trauma, recognize its systems, respond with appropriate treatment, and prevent further traumatization. It should be noted that screening for ACEs does not replace comprehensive trauma screening and assessment.</p> <p>All federally-funded programs and many state programs require that programs and services be trauma-informed.  In response to these mandates, the National Family Preservation Network developed one of the first tools for assessing family trauma.  The tool measures symptoms and indicators of trauma in both children and parents.  In the field study one of the most significant findings was the effect of past trauma in parents involved in abuse/neglect of their children or family conflict.  The tool also measures post-trauma well-being following services.  The field study showed dramatic improvement in post-trauma well-being with services primarily consisting of Intensive Family Preservation Services.</p> <p>For more information on the Trauma/Post-Trauma Well-Being tool visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/trauma-assessment-tool">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/trauma-assessment-tool</a></p> <p>To read the field study report on trauma visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/Portals/0/Documents/trauma-report.pdf">http://www.nfpn.org/Portals/0/Documents/trauma-report.pdf</a></p> <p>To read the full report on ACEs visit  <a href="https://www.childtrends.org/publications/prevalence-adverse-childhood-experiences-nationally-state-race-ethnicity/">https://www.childtrends.org/publications/prevalence-adverse-childhood-experiences-nationally-state-race-ethnicity/</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/02/27/aces-and-trauma-informed-care/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2018-02-27 15:39 +00:00 2018-02-27 07:39 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=446 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/resources-for-the-opioid-epidemic/ Other Resources for the Opioid Epidemic Did you know that 21 million Americans struggle with substance addictions annually &#8211; more than the total number of people who have all cancers combined!  Someone dies every 19 minutes from an opioid overdose—there were 64,000 overdose deaths from opioids in 2016.  A new research study correlates opioid overdose deaths with increases in reports of &#8230; Wed, 24 Jan 2018 15:11:32 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/resources-for-the-opioid-epidemic/#respond admin <p>Did you know that 21 million Americans struggle with substance addictions annually &#8211; more than the total number of people who have all cancers combined!  Someone dies every 19 minutes from an opioid overdose—there were 64,000 overdose deaths from opioids in 2016.  A new research study correlates opioid overdose deaths with increases in reports of child abuse/neglect, substantiated reports, and foster care entries.</p> <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is starting the new year by addressing the opioid epidemic.  NFPN’s perspective is different from many other organizations in that we view family, not the individual, as the focus of assistance and treatment.  We believe that families can be preserved even in the midst of an epidemic that is targeted to destroy families.</p> <p>NFPN is embarking on a Rural Opioid Project to better understand and more effectively address rural opioid use.  Rural sites in 5 states will be participating in the project and one of the goals is to develop a model response to opioid use in rural areas.</p> <p>How can we achieve keeping families together that are involved in substance abuse?  It’s helpful to recall that during a previous epidemic in the 1980’s, Intensive Family Preservation Services kept families safely together in one of the highest concentrations of crack cocaine use:  the Bronx, New York.  IFPS is an evidence-based practice that continues to be used today to keep families involved in substance abuse safely together.</p> <p>NFPN has numerous resources available on IFPS. Here are two of the most popular to start with for use in developing or strengthening IFPS programs:</p> <p>IFPS ToolKit : Comprehensive Resource Guide for the development and maintenance of strong and effective IFPS services    <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/ifps-toolkit">http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/ifps-toolkit</a></p> <p>IFPS Nationwide Survey (2014): Comparison of high-quality IFPS programs in 12 states  <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/2014-ifps-survey">http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/2014-ifps-survey</a></p> <p>Research indicates a close relationship between trauma and addiction.  About a third of all trauma survivors develop an addiction.  For those who experience trauma as children, two-thirds develop an addiction as an adult.  Thus, it’s critical that trauma be identified and treated as part of prevention and treatment of addiction.  NFPN has a tool specifically designed to assess trauma (note that this tool is used in conjunction with either the NCFAS-G or NCFAS-G+R assessment tools).  NFPN’s assessment tools have been tested and found reliable with families involved in substance abuse.</p> <p>Trauma/Post-Trauma Well-Being Assessment Tool: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/trauma-assessment-tool">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/trauma-assessment-tool</a></p> <p>To view all assessment tools visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools</a></p> <p>With substance abuse moving to the front burner of child and family-serving agencies, NFPN offers a video training on substance abuse and in-home services.  The video is designed to help train practitioners on interventions for families involved in substance abuse.  Highlights of the video include effective therapeutic techniques and an interview with a mother recovering from substance abuse and reunifying with her children.  A list of 25 supplemental materials for training is also included.  Pricing begins at $275.</p> <p>For more information and to order, email <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a> or phone 888-498-9047.</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/resources-for-the-opioid-epidemic/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2018-01-24 15:11 +00:00 2018-01-24 07:11 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=444 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/12/21/wrapping-up-2017/ Other Wrapping up 2017 This year marked the 25th anniversary of the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN). During this year we released a training video for the NCFAS-G+R assessment tool, provided a web database for the assessment tools in cooperation with Integrated Imaging, produced a video on substance abuse and in-home services, and began planning for our next 25 &#8230; Thu, 21 Dec 2017 20:17:19 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/12/21/wrapping-up-2017/#respond admin <p>This year marked the 25th anniversary of the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN). During this year we released a training video for the NCFAS-G+R assessment tool, provided a web database for the assessment tools in cooperation with Integrated Imaging, produced a video on substance abuse and in-home services, and began planning for our next 25 years!</p> <p>We’re excited to have served as the primary national voice for the preservation of families for over two decades and to continue doing so in the future. Next year we will be working on a nationwide rural opioid project to find out how rural areas are addressing this issue and how we can help strengthen and preserve families caught up in this epidemic. </p> <p>The opioid epidemic has also created renewed interest in reunifying families and father involvement and NFPN has resources, training, and technical assistance available in those areas. In addition to substance abuse, blog posts in 2017 also addressed suicide and mental health as NFPN moves more into the behavioral and mental health arena. </p> <p>Thank you for everything you do on behalf of families.</p> <p> MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR!</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/12/21/wrapping-up-2017/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2017-12-21 20:17 +00:00 2017-12-21 12:17 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=442 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/11/20/mental-health-first-aid/ Other Mental Health First Aid The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) recently coordinated a training on Mental Health First Aid (MHFA). Developed in 2001, the goal of MHFA is to teach members of the public (“helpers”) how to respond in a mental health emergency and offer support to someone who appears to be in emotional distress. Because the training is &#8230; Mon, 20 Nov 2017 14:22:35 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/11/20/mental-health-first-aid/#respond admin <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) recently coordinated a training on Mental Health First Aid (MHFA). Developed in 2001, the goal of MHFA is to teach members of the public (“helpers”) how to respond in a mental health emergency and offer support to someone who appears to be in emotional distress.</p> <p>Because the training is designed for members of the public, there are a number of generally-held myths that need to be addressed. Once thought to affect very few, it’s estimated that one in five Americans will experience a diagnosable mental disorder in any year. That means that most of us will have a family member, neighbor, colleague, friend, or others we encounter who face a mental health challenge. But we also need to keep in mind that many of these people lead productive and satisfying lives, sometimes with little or no access to formal mental health services.<br /> Recovery is defined as regaining physical, spiritual, mental, and emotional balance. The most important component of recovery is hope. This means that the most important role of the helper is to offer hope. The helper also provides support in order for the person to feel less distressed and to seek further assistance.</p> <p>The best way to help is to listen, to give the person your full attention. Listening may be the most effective link in helping a person to seek treatment. In order to listen well, the helper needs to:<br /> • Avoid premature conclusions based on your own life experiences.<br /> • Help the person understand self.<br /> • Permit the person to retain ownership of the challenge.<br /> • Listen without judging.<br /> • Maintain an optimistic attitude.</p> <p>The Mental Health First Aid Training includes a manual with the following:<br /> • Overview of mental health problems<br /> • Information on specific mental health problems including depression, suicide, anxiety disorders, psychosis, substance use, eating disorders, and crises<br /> • Action plan for help that includes assessment, listening, giving reassurance, and encouraging appropriate professional and self-help.</p> <p>A certified instructor provides the 8-hour training which is highly interactive. The training day that NFPN coordinated was offered in a rural area and attended primarily by first responders (police, firefighters, EMTs) along with a school counselor, pastors, professional mental health counselor, senior citizen center manager, and national organization administrator. The workplace cultural differences in the group were very apparent early on! However, in rural areas it’s critical to work across systems and the training was especially useful in that regard. There are no behavioral health services offered in this rural town so it’s essential to have this type of training.</p> <p>The training day (including lunch, snacks) was funded by the state behavioral health contracting organization. </p> <p>For more information visit <a href="https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/" rel="nofollow">https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/</a> </p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director </p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/11/20/mental-health-first-aid/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2017-11-20 14:22 +00:00 2017-11-20 06:22 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=440 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/10/24/principles-of-longevity/ Other Principles of Longevity Please be sure to read the Year-End Announcements at the end of this post. The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. For perspective, as few as 4% of businesses are in existence at 25 years. Nonprofits as a group are still relatively young with 90% of nonprofits having been &#8230; Tue, 24 Oct 2017 13:34:45 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/10/24/principles-of-longevity/#respond admin <p><strong>Please be sure to read the Year-End Announcements at the end of this post.</strong></p> <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is celebrating its 25<sup>th</sup> anniversary this year. For perspective, as few as 4% of businesses are in existence at 25 years. Nonprofits as a group are still relatively young with 90% of nonprofits having been created since 1950.</p> <p>What is the significance of 25 years? It so happens that 25 years is considered one generation: the length of time between the birth of an adult and the birth of this person’s child. In effect, NFPN is now a mature adult and ready to give birth..to another 25 years!</p> <p>In reviewing NFPN’s past and planning for our future, I believe that the following principles have contributed to our longevity and serve as a guide for the future:</p> <ol> <li>Mission Integrity: NFPN’s mission is to serve as the primary national voice for the preservation of families. When NFPN was first established there were many national voices promoting family preservation because a major funder paid for staff of national organizations to do this. But when the funding dried up, so did most of the national voices advocating for family preservation. NFPN has adhered to its mission throughout its existence.</li> <li>Deep Dive on Initiatives: NFPN has initiatives in four areas: family preservation, reunification, father involvement, and assessment. We have focused on these areas because all of them are critical to our mission of preserving families.</li> <li>Evidence-Based: NFPN has conducted numerous research projects and then applied the findings to tools and training that lead to best practice. And best practice advances the field which leads to more effective and efficient resources to serve families.</li> <li>Collaboration: NFPN has had over 50 partnerships with other organizations. That has allowed us to leverage our small size and limited resources into big projects and outstanding outcomes.</li> <li>Working Board: There are no celebrities on NFPN’s Board of Directors! Board members contribute their time and expertise in the roles of organizational and financial oversight, ambassadors, trainers, salesforce, and encouragers.</li> <li>Self-Sufficiency: NFPN has moved from being totally dependent on grants in the early years to becoming self-sufficient through the sale of products, training, and technical assistance. While grants are certainly welcome and appreciated, NFPN would have ceased to exist if we had remained dependent on grants.</li> </ol> <p>These core principles have guided NFPN over the past 25 years and will serve as the anchor for our future!</p> <p><strong>Important Year-End Announcements</strong>: For those customers who have/plan to purchase a NCFAS-G/NCFAS-G+R/TWB assessment tool, free web database demos are scheduled for:</p> <p>Wed, Nov 15, at 4:00 p.m. ET     Fri, Nov 17, at 11:00 a.m. ET</p> <p>To reserve a space for the database demo, please email <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a></p> <p>Introductory pricing for the web database expires on December 20, 2017.</p> <p>In response to the opioid epidemic, NFPN is offering substance abuse video training. For information, please visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/videos/substance-abuse-and-in-home-services">http://www.nfpn.org/videos/substance-abuse-and-in-home-services</a>.</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/10/24/principles-of-longevity/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2017-10-24 13:34 +00:00 2017-10-24 06:34 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=438 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/09/19/substance-abuse-video/ Other Substance Abuse Video In celebration of our 25th anniversary, The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is pleased to announce the release of a video training on Substance Abuse and In-Home Services. The new video training comes at a time when substance abuse, particularly opioids, is the most urgent health and social issue. The addictive power and potency of &#8230; Tue, 19 Sep 2017 13:46:01 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/09/19/substance-abuse-video/#respond admin <p>In celebration of our 25th anniversary, The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is pleased to announce the release of a video training on Substance Abuse and In-Home Services. </p> <p>The new video training comes at a time when substance abuse, particularly opioids, is the most urgent health and social issue. The addictive power and potency of opioids have had devastating effects on families. These include a high number of fatalities due to overdose, high number of children removed from their homes and placed in foster care, and suicides of young children in families where a parent is addicted to opioids. Every agency that provides services to children and families is grappling with this issue. </p> <p>However, it does help to keep in mind that this is not the first drug epidemic. </p> <p>The crack cocaine epidemic in the 1980’s caused widespread panic due to fears of children being irreparably damaged from being born addicted through exposure in the womb to the mother’s drug use. But a study by the University of Florida showed that the babies determined safe to be left with their addictive mothers were more developmentally advanced at six months than babies removed from their mothers and placed in foster care. It is possible to provide treatment to the substance abusing parent(s) and protect children while keeping the family safely together. </p> <p>The purpose of NFPN’s video is to contribute to the resources and training for in-home services in order to help families involved with substance abuse. NFPN recommends at least two days of initial training for practitioners and ongoing training should also be provided.</p> <p>One way to begin is by viewing some free resources that are available online:<br /> For a brief overview of substance abuse and the child welfare system visit: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/factsheets/parentalsubabuse/" rel="nofollow">https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/factsheets/parentalsubabuse/</a> </p> <p>For a comprehensive overview of addiction including neurobiology, prevention, treatment, recovery and more view the Surgeon General’s Report at <a href="https://addiction.surgeongeneral.gov/" rel="nofollow">https://addiction.surgeongeneral.gov/</a>.</p> <p>To help motivate families to make needed changes, view “Listening and The Six Stages of Change” at <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/products/247-nfpn-ifd-webcast-video" rel="nofollow">http://www.nfpn.org/products/247-nfpn-ifd-webcast-video</a>. </p> <p>NFPN’s 90-minute substance abuse video was filmed in the state of Missouri and all presenters are from that state. There are seven segments with a presenter for each segment: Interviewer, State Child Welfare Administrator, Judge, Service Provider, Supervisor, Trainer, and Therapist/Client. Also included are 25 supplemental online resources with links provided for information and training.</p> <p>For quick reference, here is the link to the online information on the video: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/videos/substance-abuse-and-in-home-services" rel="nofollow">http://www.nfpn.org/videos/substance-abuse-and-in-home-services</a></p> <p>Pricing for the video starts at $275 for up to 25 workers.</p> <p>To order, contact Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director, director@nfpn.org Phone 888-498-9047.</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/09/19/substance-abuse-video/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2017-09-19 13:46 +00:00 2017-09-19 06:46 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=436 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/comprehensive-family-assessment/ Other Comprehensive Family Assessment As we head into fall, this is the time of year when many agencies are looking at new programs and tools, including reliable and valid assessment tools. While the social services field has always sought to understand the families they are trying to assist, it has only been in the past two decades that there &#8230; Wed, 23 Aug 2017 13:40:58 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/comprehensive-family-assessment/#respond admin <p>As we head into fall, this is the time of year when many agencies are looking at new programs and tools, including reliable and valid assessment tools. While the social services field has always sought to understand the families they are trying to assist, it has only been in the past two decades that there has been an emphasis on comprehensive assessment of families.</p> <p>Pat Schene was among the first to define comprehensive family assessment which involves looking at the “big picture” of the family in terms of both strengths and weaknesses, not just symptoms or one incident. It further involves identifying, gathering, and weighing information and begins with the first contact with the family and continues until the case is closed. The purpose is to develop a service plan or intervention that addresses the major factors affecting a child’s well-being, safety, and permanency. The plan aims at helping the family get on the right track for improved functioning. Schene goes on to describe the steps involved in assessment and provides an excellent case example. Her article remains the best starting place to understand comprehensive family assessment and is available here <a href="https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/family_assessment.pdf" rel="nofollow">https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/family_assessment.pdf</a>.</p> <p>It so happens that an assessment tool for the “big picture” was in development about the same time that Schene wrote her article (it has since been updated). The original North Carolina Family Assessment Scale (NCFAS) included the domains of environment, parental capabilities, family interactions, safety, and child well-being. The initial ratings are completed at case opening are used to prioritize goals and services. The final ratings, completed at case closure, show the improvement in family functioning from the time of the initial ratings. The key to training on the tool is the case example that gives workers the opportunity to compare their ratings with the recommended ratings.</p> <p>Proliferation nationwide of assessment tools created a need for evaluating the instruments. The most comprehensive evaluation, involving 85 family assessment instruments, was conducted by a research team at the University of Berkeley in 2006. The NCFAS and NCFAS-R (for use with reunifying families) ranked at the top. The study is available here <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/articles/top-assessment-tools-for-cws" rel="nofollow">http://www.nfpn.org/articles/top-assessment-tools-for-cws</a>. </p> <p>The various versions of the NCFAS tools have been involved in dozens of studies and have consistently demonstrated reliability and validity across a wide variety of programs including family preservation, differential response, supportive housing, schools, etc. For an overview of the research visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/ncfases-scale-development-report" rel="nofollow">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/ncfases-scale-development-report</a>. </p> <p>There have been two recent developments involving the NCFAS tools. The first is the addition of two domains to address trauma and healing from trauma, the Trauma/Post-Trauma Well-Being tool. The tool was developed in response to mandates by the federal and state governments to include trauma-informed practice in all government funded services. Information on the trauma tool is available here <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/trauma-assessment-tool" rel="nofollow">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/trauma-assessment-tool</a>. </p> <p>The second development is a web database for the NCFAS tools (NCFAS-G, NCFAS-G+R, and Trauma). The web database is accessed through any internet-linked device and allows the worker to enter ratings and other information about the family. It produces aggregate reports that can be saved, printed, or exported to Excel with graph features also available. NFPN recommends that all current users of the NCFAS tools transition to the web database. More information is available here <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/ncfasgrt-database" rel="nofollow">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/ncfasgrt-database</a>. Free demos are available upon request and introductory pricing is in effect this calendar year.</p> <p>To schedule a demo of the web database or for any questions about the assessment tools, please contact Priscilla Martens, Executive Director, director@nfpn.org, 888-498-9047.</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/comprehensive-family-assessment/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2017-08-23 13:40 +00:00 2017-08-23 06:40 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=434 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/07/11/suicide-prevention/ Other Suicide Prevention I recently attended the Western States Conference on Suicide.  No conference could be more timely or necessary as western states including Nevada, Montana, Idaho, Utah, Oregon, and Wyoming have the highest suicide rates in the nation. Knowledge about suicide is greatly lacking which also hinders its prevention.  Here are some quick facts: Suicide is the &#8230; Tue, 11 Jul 2017 13:44:22 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/07/11/suicide-prevention/#respond admin <p>I recently attended the Western States Conference on Suicide.  No conference could be more timely or necessary as western states including Nevada, Montana, Idaho, Utah, Oregon, and Wyoming have the highest suicide rates in the nation.</p> <p>Knowledge about suicide is greatly lacking which also hinders its prevention.  Here are some quick facts:</p> <ul> <li>Suicide is the 10<sup>th</sup> leading cause of death in the U.S and second leading cause of death for young people ages 15-24</li> <li>There are over 40,000 deaths annually from suicide, higher than the number of deaths from traffic accidents. And deaths through suicide are greatly underreported</li> <li>45% of those completing suicide have visited a primary health care provider within the past year</li> <li>Over 1,000 people complete suicide within 72 hours of discharge from the emergency room of the hospital</li> <li>It is impossible to predict which individuals will attempt suicide but it is possible to determine the risk by group (age, mental health) and reduce symptoms &amp; suffering</li> </ul> <p>Amazingly, health care providers frequently do not receive any training on suicide even though training is essential for screening and prevention.  Trained health care professionals can identify risk of suicide and then work with patients to develop a safety plan, counsel removal of lethal means, and make sure that patients are connected to ongoing assistance (personal hand-off rather than paper referral).</p> <p>Many people who complete suicide have a diagnosis of depression and take medication to treat it.  The problem is that some of the medications that treat depression activate a gene that causes suicide ideation.  The good news is that researchers are identifying drugs, such as lithium and ketamine, that can shut off the desire to commit suicide.</p> <p>Here are some resources that can help to prevent suicide:</p> <p>Training:  No one should embark on suicide prevention without first receiving training.  A good place to start is the QPR model which stands for Question, Persuade, Refer.  A variety of online training for individuals, organizations, and professionals is available at low cost.  For more information visit <a href="http://www.qprinstitute.com/">http://www.qprinstitute.com/</a>.</p> <p>Suicide Prevention Resource Center: SPRC is the only federally-funded suicide center, sponsored by SAMHSA.    The site contains information on programs, funding for states, and a curricula developed especially for Native Alaskans and American Indians youth and young adults.  For more information, visit <a href="http://www.sprc.org">www.sprc.org</a>.  To view the manual To Live to See the Great Day that Dawns, visit <a href="http://www.sprc.org/sites/default/files/migrate/library/Suicide_Prevention_Guide.pdf">http://www.sprc.org/sites/default/files/migrate/library/Suicide_Prevention_Guide.pdf</a>.</p> <p>Hope Squad:  Utah has a peer-to-peer suicide prevention program for youth that was developed through the joint efforts of a state legislator and high school principal.  There have been no youth deaths from suicide in the Provo School District since the curriculum was implemented.  For more information visit <a href="http://hopesquad.com/">http://hopesquad.com/</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens</p> <p>NFPN Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/07/11/suicide-prevention/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2017-07-11 13:44 +00:00 2017-07-11 06:44 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=430 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/06/13/a-fathers-brain/ Other A Father’s Brain My father loved infants.  He was the most excited person in the family when my mom was pregnant and he always made the announcement.  I must have either missed or forgotten the announcement about an incoming sibling when I was five years old.  My mom disappeared one day and after a week I thought she &#8230; Tue, 13 Jun 2017 13:52:35 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/06/13/a-fathers-brain/#respond admin <p>My father loved infants.  He was the most excited person in the family when my mom was pregnant and he always made the announcement.  I must have either missed or forgotten the announcement about an incoming sibling when I was five years old.  My mom disappeared one day and after a week I thought she wasn’t coming back.  I was outside honing my survival skills by lighting matches when my folks drove up.  My mom carried something squirming in a yellow blanket.  My dad told me to put the matches away and come in the house to see the new baby.  I obeyed and put the matches away but the squirming thing looked like trouble so I passed on that.</p> <p>My father loved girls.  Four of his five children were girls.  One of the few times I saw him cry was when my youngest sister died from leukemia at the age of three. My father had to wait 40 years for another girl to arrive in the family, a great-granddaughter.  She had a close bond with my father and wrote a touching story about him when he died.</p> <p>My father loved story-telling. He would get a twinkle in his eye and commence telling a humorous story with a straight face while the rest of us roared with laughter.  In his last remaining years, he would ask me to drive him around the farm that has been in our family for 100 years.  He would tell me stories of what had happened during the early days.</p> <p>Every Father’s Day I recall my father’s stories, his character, and his deep love for his family.  This year I’ve also discovered some interesting research about a father’s brain. Consider the following:</p> <ul> <li>A study of expectant fathers showed that midpregnancy ultrasound is a key moment in connecting with the baby. However, while moms think about cuddling the baby, dads think about the child’s future.</li> <li>A father’s brain changes while caring for a baby, similar to brain changes in the mother, to reflect his new care-giving role.</li> <li>According to brain scans, fathers with toddler daughters are more attentive and responsive to their daughters’ needs than fathers with toddler sons are to the needs of sons.</li> </ul> <p>If my father were still here, I would share the brain research findings with him. But I already know how he would respond.  He would just laugh.  Because he already knew that.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>NFPN has many resources on father involvement.  For an overview visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement</a></p> <p>In honor of Father’s Day, NFPN is offering <em>The Complete Guide to Father Involvement </em>(<a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/guide-to-father-inv">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/guide-to-father-inv</a>) FREE with purchase of:</p> <p><em>Basic Fatherhood Training Curriculum Package: </em><a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/basic-training-package"><em>http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/basic-training-package</em></a></p> <p><em>Advanced Fatherhood Training Curriculum Package: </em><a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/advanced-training-pack"><em>http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/advanced-training-pack</em></a></p> <p>Pricing begins at $150 per training package for up to 25 workers or $275 for both.  For ordering and more info contact Priscilla Martens, <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a>.</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens</p> <p>NFPN Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/06/13/a-fathers-brain/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2017-06-13 13:52 +00:00 2017-06-13 06:52 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=428 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/05/10/mothers-day/ Other Mother’s Day In the 25 years of National Family Preservation Network’s (NFPN) existence, there has never been a News Notes about Mother’ Day.  Let’s remedy that now! I vividly recall Mother’s Day 2013.  At 5:30 a.m. that morning, my sister called.  When you have elderly parents, the phone calls always come between midnight and 6:00 a.m. and &#8230; Wed, 10 May 2017 13:46:08 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/05/10/mothers-day/#respond admin <p>In the 25 years of National Family Preservation Network’s (NFPN) existence, there has never been a News Notes about Mother’ Day.  Let’s remedy that now!</p> <p>I vividly recall Mother’s Day 2013.  At 5:30 a.m. that morning, my sister called.  When you have elderly parents, the phone calls always come between midnight and 6:00 a.m. and they are never good.  She said my mom was on the way to the hospital in an ambulance.  By the time I arrived, my mom was regaining consciousness and was able to give a big smile to her two daughters, perhaps thinking she would be able to spend Mother’s Day with most of her family which turned out to be the case.</p> <p>The attending doctor was less cheerful and said there were so many things wrong with my mom that he gave her only a 50-50 chance of surviving the day.  After he left the room, we pondered that for a while and then my sister said, “I don’t know&#8212;Mom’s color is good now—I think she’ll be okay.”  Since my sister had known my mom for a lot longer time than the doctor, I decided to go with her prognosis.  And she was right!  But that was the beginning of a 17-day hospital odyssey.</p> <p>During those 17 days I learned every nook and cranny in the hospital, the personalities of all the nursing staff, and the healthy choices menu in the cafeteria.  I had 5 meals of fish in a row!  I also learned the names of every disease that you can get during a hospital stay.  For a while, they thought my mom had “C-diff” and everyone had to wear a gown, mask, and gloves.  Fortunately, that only lasted for a day until the test came back negative…or I would have suffocated wearing the mask!  I had a horrible sore throat the first couple of days but a quick trip to quick care ruled out anything serious or contagious, again sparing me from the mask.</p> <p>The main thing I noticed during that long period of time was that time stops as soon as you enter the hospital doors.  Sometimes I would be there for 4 hours and it would seem like 15 minutes…or the reverse!  Listening to the machines that my mom was hooked up to gurgle, buzz, and shriek was the only way to gauge the passing of time.  Eventually, the nurses would come and turn off the shrieking and say they didn’t know why the alarm went off.   Mostly you wait. You wait for the blood test to be taken because they can’t find a vein, you wait for the test results, you wait for the doctor to come and make another prognosis, and you wait to find out when your mom can leave.</p> <p>Meanwhile, your mom is enjoying all the attention and constant care.  Other than the blood-drawing, it was quite pleasant for her.  My mom loved the Care Channel on TV that has an infinite loop of nature scenes accompanied by soft music although she sometimes asked who was in bed with her due to the audio coming through her remote.   She was well-rested by the end of the 17 days while I was completely exhausted.</p> <p>Then, suddenly, all the waiting and prognoses aligned and my mom was dismissed to enter a nursing home, a four-month odyssey with a sad ending and a story for another time.</p> <p>My mom loved cats, dogs, small children, pizza, God, family, and nature programs.  If she were here on this Mother’s Day, would I be willing to repeat the 2013 odyssey?  In a heartbeat!  But, I would want to have a more extensive healthy choices menu.</p> <p>Happy Mother’s Day to all moms everywhere.  We’ll never forget you.</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/05/10/mothers-day/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2017-05-10 13:46 +00:00 2017-05-10 06:46 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=425 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/04/20/evidence-based-practice-2/ Other Evidence-Based Practice When the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) was founded 25 years ago, there were no standards for Evidence-Based Practice.  However, since its inception NFPN has supported evidence-based practice including one of the first child welfare programs demonstrating effectiveness through research: Intensive Family Preservation Services. What is the definition of Evidence-Based Practice? The gold standard comes &#8230; Thu, 20 Apr 2017 13:40:20 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/04/20/evidence-based-practice-2/#respond admin <p>When the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) was founded 25 years ago, there were no standards for Evidence-Based Practice.  However, since its inception NFPN has supported evidence-based practice including one of the first child welfare programs demonstrating effectiveness through research: Intensive Family Preservation Services.</p> <p>What is the definition of Evidence-Based Practice? The gold standard comes from the field of medicine with the Institute of Medicine defining it as:</p> <ul> <li>Best Research Evidence</li> <li>Best Clinical Experience</li> <li>Consistent with Family/Client Values</li> </ul> <p>Today all fields, including social work, have adopted standards for Evidence-Based Practice (EBP). More narrowly, the field of child welfare has a searchable registry of EBP available through the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare. The Clearinghouse uses a scientific rating scale of 1-5 to determine the level of research evidence and the following is a description of each level:</p> <ul> <li>Well-supported by research evidence: Two rigorous randomized controlled trials (RCT), with sustained effect for at least one year post-treatment, and published in peer-reviewed literature</li> <li>Supported by research evidence: One RCT, with sustained effect for at least six months post-treatment, and published in peer-reviewed literature</li> <li>Promising research evidence: One study using a control group and published in peer-reviewed literature</li> <li>Evidence fails to demonstrate effect: Two RCT studies have found the practice has not resulted in improved outcomes and published in peer-reviewed literature</li> <li>Concerning practice: Multiple outcome studies suggest the intervention has a negative effect and/or risk of harm</li> <li>Not able to be rated: Does not meet criteria for any other level and is generally accepted in clinical practice as appropriate and there is no known risk of harm</li> </ul> <p>All ratings also require a written description of the components of the practice protocol and how to administer it, and the program must be replicable. The list of descriptions have been abbreviated; to view the complete descriptions visit <a href="http://www.cebc4cw.org/ratings/scientific-rating-scale/">http://www.cebc4cw.org/ratings/scientific-rating-scale/</a></p> <p>The CEBC was launched in 2006 and has over 40 topic areas with over 300 programs plus a special section for measurement tools.  The complete list of topics is available here: <a href="http://www.cebc4cw.org/search/by-topic-area/">http://www.cebc4cw.org/search/by-topic-area/</a>.  Suppose that  you wish to find evidence-based programs for Trauma Treatment for Children and Adolescents.  Programs, beginning with the top level rating, are listed on one web page to allow a quick review: <a href="http://www.cebc4cw.org/topic/trauma-treatment-client-level-interventions-child-adolescent/">http://www.cebc4cw.org/topic/trauma-treatment-client-level-interventions-child-adolescent/</a>.  You can then select a specific program to obtain a detailed report.</p> <p>For a webinar overview of the CEBC, visit: <a href="http://www.cebc4cw.org/cebc-webinars/cebc-sponsored-webinars/looking-beyond-the-numbers/">http://www.cebc4cw.org/cebc-webinars/cebc-sponsored-webinars/looking-beyond-the-numbers/</a>.The CEBC is not an exhaustive resource and it is not recommended for use as the sole source of evidence-based practice.</p> <p>There are other evidence-based clearinghouses such as the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices with more than 350 mental health and substance use interventions.  Programs listed must have a random control trial or control/comparison group study published in peer-reviewed literature. Programs are not rated effective or ineffective but are rated on the quality of research. Evidence ratings are based on outcomes. An outcome rating instrument is used to review each program with four levels of outcome ratings: effective, promising, ineffective, and inconclusive.  For example, entering “trauma” into “Find an Intervention” lists all of the reviewed programs and a color-coded rating for each outcome that was tested.</p> <p>For more information on this registry visit <a href="http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/landing.aspx">http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/landing.aspx</a>.</p> <p>NFPN recommends checking EBP registries when EBPs are required by government contracts or when considering design and implementation of a new program.  If there is a program listed that could meet the need, it will save you a tremendous amount of time and resources.</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens</p> <p>NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/04/20/evidence-based-practice-2/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2017-04-20 13:40 +00:00 2017-04-20 06:40 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=422 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/03/29/q-and-a/ Other Q and A The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) receives inquiries on a regular basis. Here are some of the most frequent questions….and answers: How can my agency establish effective family preservation services? NFPN has conducted six research studies on Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS) with all demonstrating its effectiveness. The studies included both placement prevention and reunification &#8230; Wed, 29 Mar 2017 13:51:46 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/03/29/q-and-a/#respond admin <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) receives inquiries on a regular basis. Here are some of the most frequent questions….and answers:</p> <p><strong>How can my agency establish effective family preservation services?</strong></p> <p>NFPN has conducted six research studies on Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS) with all demonstrating its effectiveness. The studies included both placement prevention and reunification services.   NFPN has also conducted three nationwide surveys of IFPS in the past 10 years. The studies and surveys tell us that key characteristics of effective IFPS programs include 24/7 availability of staff, low caseloads (2-4), brief duration (4-6 weeks), intensive services (40 hours or more of face-to-face contact), high rate of keeping families together (90% or higher at case closure), and an annual program evaluation.</p> <p>A good starting place for developing an effective family preservation program is the IFPS ToolKit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/ifps-toolkit">http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/ifps-toolkit</a></p> <p>For examples of state RFPs, standards, and annual evaluation reports, visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/state-resources">http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/state-resources</a></p> <p>A fidelity/quality improvement tool, CQI-IFPS Instrument, is available here: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/cqi-ifps-instrument">http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/cqi-ifps-instrument</a><u>  </u></p> <p><strong>How can I find a reliable and valid assessment tool to meet the requirements of my agency’s government-contracted services?</strong></p> <p>The California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare has rated 20 measurement tools. You can view the list of tools and ratings here: <a href="http://www.cebc4cw.org/assessment-tools/measurement-tools-highlighted-on-the-cebc/">http://www.cebc4cw.org/assessment-tools/measurement-tools-highlighted-on-the-cebc/</a>.</p> <p>The Clearinghouse has given the North Carolina Family Assessment Scale (NCFAS) an “A” rating. The NCFAS scales measure family functioning. NFPN has conducted 6 research projects involving the assessment tools, all of them confirming the reliability and validity of the tools. A summary of research studies on the tools is available here: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/ncfases-scale-development-report">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/ncfases-scale-development-report</a></p> <p>NFPN most recently released the Trauma/Post-Trauma Well-Being Tool (TWB). Designed for use with either the NCFAS-G or NCFAS-G+R assessment tools, the TWB tool assists workers to identify symptoms and indicators of trauma and the extent of healing following services. Detailed information is available here: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/trauma-assessment-tool">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/trauma-assessment-tool</a></p> <p><strong>Is a web-based data entry system available for the assessment tools?</strong></p> <p>YES!   NFPN has worked with a developer, Integrated Imaging, to design a web database specifically for the NCFAS tools (NCFAS-G, NCFAS-G+R, and TWB). The web database includes demographics, reasons for referral, case plan forms, print/save features, research-caliber reports, and technical assistance.</p> <p>Take a test drive by participating in a free <strong>web database demo</strong> scheduled for:</p> <p><strong>Wednesday, April 12, at 11:30 ET OR</strong></p> <p><strong>Thursday, April 20, at 4:00 ET</strong></p> <p><strong>Register by emailing Priscilla Martens, </strong><a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org"><strong>director@nfpn.org</strong></a></p> <p>For more details on the web database visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/ncfasgrt-database">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/ncfasgrt-database</a></p> <p><strong>Are there any videos or printed materials to train agency staff on father involvement?</strong></p> <p>NFPN has two videos on father involvement. Each video is part of a training curriculum on father involvement that also includes a manual, training script, handouts, and other resources.</p> <p>Information on the <em>Basic Fatherhood Training Curriculum Package </em>is available here: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/basic-training-package">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/basic-training-package</a> while information on the <em>Advanced Fatherhood Training Curriculum Package </em>is available here: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/advanced-training-pack">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/advanced-training-pack</a></p> <p>Pricing begins at $150 per training package for up to 25 workers or $275 for both. To order contact Priscilla Martens, <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a> Note: the fatherhood training is not designed for use with fatherhood groups.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/03/29/q-and-a/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2017-03-29 13:51 +00:00 2017-03-29 06:51 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=420 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/02/07/web-database-for-ncfas-tools/ Other Web Database for NCFAS Tools The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) has always provided an electronic database system for the NCFAS assessment tools. The current electronic database was built on a Microsoft Access platform, runs on Windows only, and replicates the hard copy of the rating forms. It’s designed for installation on individual computers with aggregate data exported to Excel. &#8230; Tue, 07 Feb 2017 19:59:21 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/02/07/web-database-for-ncfas-tools/#respond admin <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) has always provided an electronic database system for the NCFAS assessment tools. The current electronic database was built on a Microsoft Access platform, runs on Windows only, and replicates the hard copy of the rating forms. It’s designed for installation on individual computers with aggregate data exported to Excel. It is included with purchase of a NCFAS tool/training package and is accessed through digital download. While customers may continue to use the Access database for as long as they wish, technical assistance is no longer available.</p> <p>NFPN is now offering a web database that is faster, more user-friendly, and has many more features than the current database. The web database developer, Integrated Imaging, worked with NFPN to design the database specifically for use with the NCFAS assessment tools (NCFAS-G, NCFAS-G+R, Trauma/Post Trauma Well-Being). The database includes the following features to meet the needs of workers:</p> <ul> <li>Accessible through the internet</li> <li>Unique identifier in order to easily track families</li> <li>Demographics on caregivers and children (age, gender, race, ethnicity, living situation at case opening/closure, reasons for referral, etc.)</li> <li>Quick access to definitions to assist in completing ratings</li> <li>Indicators/graphs to inform workers of status of completion of ratings on assigned families</li> <li>Case plan form that guides the worker in developing goals and services</li> <li>Immediate access to reports on progress of any family or all families</li> <li>Ability to print/save data and reports or export to Excel</li> </ul> <p>The following features meet the needs of supervisors and administrators</p> <ul> <li>Unique family code to ensure confidentiality</li> <li>Ability to track each worker’s progress with families</li> <li>Requirement for 100% entry of opening/closing ratings (no missing ratings)</li> <li>Reporting features on completed cases that show the number and the percent of families at each domain, percent of families that are at baseline/above, percent of families with problem ratings (mild, moderate, serious)</li> <li>Immediate access to reports and status of completion of ratings on families</li> <li>Conversion of reports to graphs for visuals</li> <li>Customizable to meet additional needs of an agency</li> </ul> <p>The web database is available with past purchase or current purchase of the NCFAS-G, NCFAS-G+R, and Trauma tools. If your agency currently uses either the NCFAS or NCFAS-R tools, you can upgrade at a discounted price. The annual fee, paid to the vendor, will include technical assistance and other support for use. The activation fee will be waived this year so sign up early for the most savings!</p> <p><strong>Free demonstrations of the new database are scheduled for (choose one):</strong></p> <p><strong>Thurs, Feb 23, 11:00 a.m. ET                                                                               </strong></p> <p><strong>Wed, March 1, 4:00 p.m. ET</strong></p> <p>To register for the demonstration, and to obtain additional information and fees contact Priscilla Martens, Executive Director, <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a>, 888-498-9047.</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens</p> <p>Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/02/07/web-database-for-ncfas-tools/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2017-02-07 19:59 +00:00 2017-02-07 11:59 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=418 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/01/25/two-new-resources/ Other Two New Resources The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year!  Throughout the year we will be sharing tidbits from our history, plans for the present, and visions for the future.  For our first historical tidbit, did you know that NFPN was originally named the Intensive Family Preservation Services National Network, Inc.?  The &#8230; Wed, 25 Jan 2017 14:32:27 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/01/25/two-new-resources/#respond admin <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is celebrating its 25<sup>th</sup> anniversary this year!  Throughout the year we will be sharing tidbits from our history, plans for the present, and visions for the future.  For our first historical tidbit, did you know that NFPN was originally named the Intensive Family Preservation Services National Network, Inc.?  The reason for that long name is that NFPN was founded to promote Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS). For a more detailed description of how we have fulfilled that purpose, please visit the Preserving Families Blog at <a href="https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/">https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/</a>.</p> <p>NFPN customarily releases new resources at the beginning of every year.  <strong>To kick off 2017, NFPN is releasing the NCFAS-G+R Video Training in January and a new web database for the NCFAS tools in February.</strong></p> <p>The 90-minute NCFAS-G+R video includes the following:</p> <ul> <li>Presenter’s overview of the NCFAS-G+R assessment tool and how it works</li> <li>Participants’ discussion of ratings on the case example</li> <li>Completing the case plan form and FAQs</li> </ul> <p>The small group discussion is especially rich in terms of addressing issues that frequently arise during training such as:</p> <ul> <li>rating the family as a whole</li> <li>professional and personal values and assumptions that affect ratings</li> <li>historical vs. current issues in the family</li> <li>tool vs. diagnostic test</li> <li>definitions as guiding language</li> </ul> <p>In addition to the video content, the following supplemental materials are included in a zip file:</p> <ul> <li>NCFAS-G+R Video Guide Overview</li> <li>NCFAS-G+R Video PowerPoint</li> <li>NCFAS-G+R Scale and Definitions</li> <li>NCFAS-G+R Case Study</li> <li>NCFAS-G+R Case Plan Form</li> <li>NCFAS-G+R FAQs</li> </ul> <p>The video training was conducted with participants who had never before used any of the NCFAS tools.  These participants were learning to use the NCFAS-G+R while at the same time learning how to train others to use the tool.  Thus, the video training does not assume any familiarity with the tool.</p> <p>The video training is intended to replace most onsite training at a fraction of the cost and can be used multiple times.  For agencies that still desire onsite training on the NCFAS-G+R, the video training will be included in the fee.</p> <p>While those who train on the NCFAS-G+R will find the video training most useful, it is available to any licensed user of the NCFAS-G+R.  The price is $275 with download delivery.  For more information and to purchase, contact Priscilla Martens, Executive Director, <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a>, 888-498-9047.</p> <p><strong>The NCFAS web database is coming in February!</strong>  The web database developer, Integrated Imaging, worked with NFPN to design the database specifically for use with the NCFAS assessment tools (NCFAS-G, NCFAS-G+R, Trauma/Post Trauma Well-Being).  While preserving some features of the current Microsoft Access database, the new web database will be accessible from any internet device, will be user-friendly with quick and easy data entry, and will produce immediate reports for use by workers, supervisors, administrators, and evaluators.</p> <p>If you’re interested in purchasing the new web database, you may sign up in advance by contacting Priscilla Martens, Executive Director, <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a>, 888-498-9047.  You also save money by signing up early as activation fees are waived this year.</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens</p> <p>Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2017/01/25/two-new-resources/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2017-01-25 14:32 +00:00 2017-01-25 06:32 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=415 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/12/19/highlights-of-2016/ Other Highlights of 2016 Here are some of the highlights of 2016 and a peek into 2017: Assessment Tools During 2016, 120 agencies purchased one or more assessment tools and training packages to train over 2,000 workers. In turn, these workers will use the tools with over 40,000 families.  Approximately one-third of agencies purchasing assessment tools were from countries &#8230; Mon, 19 Dec 2016 16:22:50 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/12/19/highlights-of-2016/#respond admin <p>Here are some of the highlights of 2016 and a <strong>peek</strong> into 2017:</p> <p><em><strong>Assessment Tools</strong></em></p> <p>During 2016, 120 agencies purchased one or more assessment tools and training packages to train over 2,000 workers. In turn, these workers will use the tools with over 40,000 families.  Approximately one-third of agencies purchasing assessment tools were from countries outside the U.S.</p> <p>There is still time this year to purchase an assessment tool or other resource from NFPN.  To get started visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools</a>.</p> <p><strong><em>Training and Technical Assistance</em></strong></p> <p>NFPN provided a series of three webinar trainings on family preservation and in-home services.  Four additional webinars/conference calls were provided on the assessment tools, and four onsite trainings were provided on the assessment tools.</p> <p>One of the training sites participated in the development of a video for training-of-trainers on the NCFAS-G+R assessment tool. <strong>The video and training package will be released in January.  </strong></p> <p><strong>NFPN worked with a developer on a web database for the assessment tools with release planned early next year.</strong></p> <p><strong><em>Research</em></strong><strong>                                                                                                     </strong>NFPN collaborated with other agencies to develop four research proposals this year.  One proposal, starting in January, involves school social workers using the NCFAS-G with students and their families in a large school district in Idaho.</p> <p><strong><em>Social Media</em></strong></p> <p>NFPN publishes two blogs, <em>Preserving Families</em> and <em>News Notes </em>with monthly posts.</p> <p><strong><em>Farewell to 2016</em></strong></p> <p>NFPN has enjoyed a busy, productive year. It’s a privilege to serve you as you serve families.</p> <p><strong>Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!</strong></p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens</p> <p>NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/12/19/highlights-of-2016/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2016-12-19 16:22 +00:00 2016-12-19 08:22 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=413 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/11/15/neglect/ Other Neglect When people think about child maltreatment, they often think of it in terms of physical and sexual abuse. In reality, these two categories constitute only a quarter of maltreatment while incidents of neglect make up three quarters of maltreatment. Despite being the overwhelming reason for child maltreatment, neglect has not received the attention and focus &#8230; Tue, 15 Nov 2016 14:28:11 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/11/15/neglect/#respond admin <p>When people think about child maltreatment, they often think of it in terms of physical and sexual abuse. In reality, these two categories constitute only a quarter of maltreatment while incidents of neglect make up three quarters of maltreatment. Despite being the overwhelming reason for child maltreatment, neglect has not received the attention and focus necessary for effective identification, prevention, and treatment.</p> <p>Let’s begin with identification. Federal law defines neglect as any recent act or failure to act on the part of the parent which results in harm to the child or an imminent risk of serious harm. State laws commonly define neglect as the failure of a parent/caretaker to provide basics such as food, clothing, medical care, and supervision to the degree that the child’s health, safety, and well-being are threatened with harm. Research shows that the consequences of neglect may be even more serious than the consequences of abuse. They include impaired brain development that can result in impaired intellectual and cognitive development, deficient emotional and psychological development, and problems with social and behavioral development.</p> <p>Here are three family factors that can impact neglect:</p> <ol> <li>Poverty: Families living in poverty are 40 times more likely to be referred to the child welfare system than higher-income families</li> <li>Parental substance abuse: this factor is more closely related to neglect than other forms of maltreatment due to the parent’s impaired reason, failure to keep the child safe, and not meeting the child’s basic needs.</li> <li>Domestic violence: the non-offending parent is sometimes charged with the neglect of “failure to protect” and thus is in need of safety and resources to meet the children’s needs</li> </ol> <p>This overview of neglect is summarized from a Child Welfare Information Gateway bulletin available here: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/focus/acts/">https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/focus/acts/</a></p> <p>A new book, <em>Tackling Child Neglect, </em>edited by my friend and colleague Ruth Gardner in London, England, greatly contributes to our understanding of neglect. The book contains a broad review of the literature, the most recent research, and best practice in addressing neglect. Especially compelling are the chapters on best practice that include a discussion of the following interventions:</p> <ul> <li>Triple P (Positive Parenting Program)</li> <li>Incredible Years</li> <li>Nurse-Family Partnership</li> <li>Family Connections</li> <li>Parents as Teachers</li> <li>SafeCare</li> <li>Video Interaction Guidance</li> </ul> <p>Family Connections, SafeCare, and Video Interaction Guidance explicitly focus on neglect. Families participating in a SafeCare program in England that was implemented through the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) were successful in reducing the need for legal intervention for neglect. Even families that did not complete the program had positive outcomes.</p> <p>Video Interaction Guidance engages parents in a change process through video showing the parent interacting well with the child. Then, the practitioner and parent discuss how to build on that interaction to create many more successful interactions with the child. Although initially reluctant to participate, parents quickly learn to appreciate the immediate feedback of the video and the motivation it provides to improve parenting skills.</p> <p>The book <em>Tackling Child Neglect </em>is available through Amazon.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens</p> <p>NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/11/15/neglect/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2016-11-15 14:28 +00:00 2016-11-15 06:28 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=411 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/10/25/faith-based-social-services/ Other Faith-Based Social Services Americans donate about $120 billion a year to religious organizations which reflects one-third of all charitable contributions.  Faith-based organizations, including churches, provide numerous social services. In A History of Charity and the Church presented by Nicholas Placido at the North American Christians in Social Work 2015 convention, we learn that almost all modern social services &#8230; Tue, 25 Oct 2016 13:44:42 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/10/25/faith-based-social-services/#respond admin <p>Americans donate about $120 billion a year to religious organizations which reflects one-third of all charitable contributions.  Faith-based organizations, including churches, provide numerous social services.</p> <p>In <em>A History of Charity and the Church </em>presented by Nicholas Placido at the North American Christians in Social Work 2015 convention, we learn that almost all modern social services can be traced back to religious organizations.  Religious organizations in American established orphanages, the Salvation Army, YMCA, YWCA, and Volunteers of America. To read the full paper visit <a href="http://www.nacsw.org/Convention/PlacidoNAHistoryFINAL.pdf">http://www.nacsw.org/Convention/PlacidoNAHistoryFINAL.pdf</a>.</p> <p>Two of the largest faith-based organizations currently providing social services are:</p> <ul> <li>Lutheran Social Services in America composed of 300 Lutheran nonprofit organizations serving 6 million people annually (1 in 50 Americans)</li> <li>Catholic Charities USA, the national office for over 160 local agencies, serving 9 million people annually</li> </ul> <p>The United States Senate Caucus on Foster Youth held a briefing on September 28 that featured faith-based organizations.  Jason Weber, National Director of Foster Care Initiatives for the Christian Alliance for Orphans, presented on Family Preservation, Support, and Reunification.  Communities of faith are uniquely positioned for preservation and reunification because of</p> <ul> <li>A existing worldview that celebrates redemption and reconciliation</li> <li>An existing supportive community and</li> <li>An existing set of uniquely suited programs and structures including <ul> <li style="text-align:left;">Recovery</li> <li style="text-align:left;">Marriage</li> <li style="text-align:left;">Parenting</li> <li style="text-align:left;">Mentoring</li> <li style="text-align:left;">Personal finance</li> <li style="text-align:left;">Benevolence</li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p>Let’s take a closer look at two of the “uniquely suited programs” that faith-based organizations provide.  Safe Families for Children was founded in 2003 in Chicago to help families in crisis by providing host families for short-term care of children.  Host families provide this care at no cost.  This service also prevents children from  entering state-funded foster care.  Now located in 70 cities, the program has over 4,600 host families that have provided care for over 24,000 children.   To see how the program works in action, watch the four-minute video here: <a href="https://vimeo.com/184369988">https://vimeo.com/184369988</a></p> <p>For more information on Safe Families for Children, visit <a href="http://safe-families.org/">http://safe-families.org/</a></p> <p>Another program, the CarePortal, matches needs of children in the child welfare system with the resources of local churches.  A child welfare caseworker emails the need to the network of churches.  If a church can meet the need, it responds and then provides the resource.  Some of the needs that churches meet are providing beds, bus passes, groceries, assistance with rent and utilities, and school clothing.</p> <p>A foster mom found herself on the side of the road with a blown car engine and two foster children missing needed appointments.  She had been saving money for a car but did not have a sufficient amount to rent a car.   She had to walk the toddler to day care in the mornings before walking to work.  When a church was informed of the need, they provided a car at no cost to the foster mom.  Over 875 churches are helping 5,000 children this year.  For more information visit <a href="https://careportal.org/">https://careportal.org/</a>.</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens</p> <p>NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/10/25/faith-based-social-services/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2016-10-25 13:44 +00:00 2016-10-25 06:44 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=409 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/09/13/opiates/ Other Opiates In testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance earlier this year, Dr. Nancy K. Young, the Director of Children and Family Futures, paints a grim portrait of opiate use. Over a seven-year period of time, heroin dependency has doubled and overdose rates have nearly tripled. Over 10 million people report non-medical use of prescription &#8230; Tue, 13 Sep 2016 13:33:50 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/09/13/opiates/#respond admin <p>In testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance earlier this year, Dr. Nancy K. Young, the Director of Children and Family Futures, paints a grim portrait of opiate use.</p> <ul> <li>Over a seven-year period of time, heroin dependency has doubled and overdose rates have nearly tripled.</li> <li>Over 10 million people report non-medical use of prescription painkillers.</li> <li>About half of infants born with exposure to opioids (NAS) during the mother’s pregnancy will experience withdrawal.</li> <li>Children placed in out-of-home care due to parental substance abuse is fast becoming the main reason for removal, with infants making up the largest share.</li> </ul> <p>What can be done to help families affected by opiate use?  The federal government has funded two grant programs that include evaluation.  Regional Partnerships  have been funded since 2006 with a total of 82 grants (including extensions).  Here are the key outcomes:</p> <ul> <li>With services, most children were able to remain safely at home.</li> <li>83% of children in out-of-home placement were reunified with their family.</li> <li>Only 4% of children had substantiated mistreatment within 6 months of returning home.</li> </ul> <p>One of the Regional Partnership programs uses a model of Intensive Family Preservation Services to help families of NAS infants, with the following outcomes:</p> <ul> <li>Mean scores on family functioning as measured by the NCFAS assessment tools showed improvement in all 10 domains.</li> <li>91% of children have remained in their homes following services.</li> <li>91% of families have had no additional substantiated maltreatment.</li> </ul> <p>The federal government has also funded meth grants which have been used to support 12 drug courts (about 350 drug courts nationwide serve 19,000 families annually).  Here are the outcomes from the 12 meth drug courts:</p> <ul> <li>90% of children were able to remain in their own home.</li> <li>Keeping children safely at home saved over $34,000 per child in placement costs at one site.</li> <li>68% of children in out-of-home placement were reunified within 12 months.</li> <li>Under 6% of children re-entered foster care.</li> </ul> <p>To read the complete testimony, visit: <a href="http://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/23feb2016Young.pdf">http://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/23feb2016Young.pdf</a></p> <p>The federal government has just issued a publication, “A Collaborative Approach to the Treatment of Pregnant Women with Opioid Use Disorders,” that provides guidance to child welfare professionals and service providers as they work to address this population&#8217;s unique needs.  The report recommends building a collaborative team with a comprehensive framework for intervention.</p> <p>To view the report, visit: <a href="https://www.ncsacw.samhsa.gov/resources/opioid-use-disorders-and-medication-assisted-treatment/default.aspx">https://www.ncsacw.samhsa.gov/resources/opioid-use-disorders-and-medication-assisted-treatment/default.aspx</a></p> <p>New federal legislation (H.R. 5456) would fund substance abuse prevention and treatment services to keep families together.  The Family First Prevention Services Act is supported by over 400 organizations, including NFPN, and was passed by the House of Representatives in June.  It is awaiting action in the Senate.</p> <p>To view the legislation, visit: <a href="https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/5456/text">https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/5456/text</a>.</p> <p>For a summary of the legislation, visit: <a href="http://waysandmeans.house.gov/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Family-First-Prevention-Services-Act-Summary-061016.pdf">http://waysandmeans.house.gov/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Family-First-Prevention-Services-Act-Summary-061016.pdf</a>.</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/09/13/opiates/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2016-09-13 13:33 +00:00 2016-09-13 06:33 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=407 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/08/24/father-involvement/ Other Father Involvement The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) would like to introduce you to some organizations and programs that are doing excellent work in the area of father involvement. The Birth Parent National Network was initially funded by Casey Family Programs.  It is part of the National Alliance of Children’s Trust and Prevention Funds.  The Network champions &#8230; Wed, 24 Aug 2016 13:23:38 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/08/24/father-involvement/#respond admin <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) would like to introduce you to some organizations and programs that are doing excellent work in the area of father involvement.</p> <p><strong>The Birth Parent National Network</strong> was initially funded by Casey Family Programs.  It is part of the National Alliance of Children’s Trust and Prevention Funds.  The Network champions parents as leaders and strategic partners in prevention and child welfare systems reform.  Programs help fathers navigate the child welfare system, work cooperatively with mothers for the well-being of children, and provide input for child welfare case staffings.</p> <p>For more information on the Birth Parent National Network visit: <a href="http://bpnn.ctfalliance.org/">http://bpnn.ctfalliance.org/</a></p> <p>The mission of the <strong>Native American Fatherhood and Families Association</strong> (NAFFA) is to strengthen families by responsibly involving fathers in the lives of their children, families and communities, and partnering with mothers to provide happy and safe families. The programs emphasize linking generations through relationships, addressing family violence/abuse, and teaching that fatherhood and motherhood are sacred.  NAFFA is one of the most effective organizations that you’ve likely never heard of:  the organization has served 185 tribes without ever receiving a federal grant.</p> <p>For more information on the Native American Fatherhood and Families Association visit: <a href="http://nativeamericanfathers.org/">http://nativeamericanfathers.org/</a></p> <p>Over 9,000 fathers have participated in <strong>Project Fatherhood, </strong>this year celebrating 20 years of operation in Los Angeles.  Program components include support groups for men, job club, children’s groups, and significant others groups.  The programs address stress, separation and loss, child abuse and neglect, poor self-esteem, and generational issues to help fathers become better parents so that their children can grow up to become healthy adults.</p> <p>For more information on Project Fatherhood visit: <a href="http://www.projectfatherhood.org/">http://www.projectfatherhood.org/</a></p> <p><strong>Fathers for Change</strong> is an intervention program for fathers involved in substance abuse and domestic violence.  About half of domestic violence incidents also include substance abuse and child abuse.  Domestic violence in the home is the strongest risk factor for next generation violence.  However, two-thirds of mothers say that their child is attached to the perpetrator father and regularly see their father at six months following an incident.  There are few effective treatment programs for domestic violence.</p> <p>The goals of Fathers for Change are:<br /> 1) Cessation of violence and aggression</p> <p>2) Abstinence from substances</p> <p>3) Improved co-parenting</p> <p>4) Decreased negative parenting behaviors</p> <p>5) Increased positive parenting behaviors</p> <p>Fathers for Change is currently offered in Florida and Connecticut and initial studies have showed positive results in reduction of fathers’ anger and aggression. With additional studies, Fathers for Change is positioned to become an Evidence-Based Practice that includes a manual and training curricula.</p> <p>For more information on Fathers for Change visit: <a href="http://mhlp.fmhi.usf.edu/newsEvents/mhlpnewsitem.cfm?item=316">http://mhlp.fmhi.usf.edu/newsEvents/mhlpnewsitem.cfm?item=316</a></p> <p>To read NFPN’s report on <em>Integrating and Sustaining Father Involvement</em> visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/sustaining-father-inv">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/sustaining-father-inv</a></p> <p>For training curricula and resources on father involvement visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/index.php?option=com_content&amp;view=article&amp;id=48:basic-fatherhood-training-curriculum&amp;catid=24&amp;Itemid=124">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/index.php?option=com_content&amp;view=article&amp;id=48:basic-fatherhood-training-curriculum&amp;catid=24&amp;Itemid=124</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Posted by Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/08/24/father-involvement/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2016-08-24 13:23 +00:00 2016-08-24 06:23 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=404 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/07/13/helping-our-communities/ Other Helping Our Communities During the summertime when work nationwide slows down a bit, I can give more attention to my local community.  This summer the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) convened a meeting of leaders in the community to discuss critical needs and how we could work together to address them. I live in a rural community in &#8230; Wed, 13 Jul 2016 15:42:09 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/07/13/helping-our-communities/#respond admin <p>During the summertime when work nationwide slows down a bit, I can give more attention to my local community.  This summer the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) convened a meeting of leaders in the community to discuss critical needs and how we could work together to address them.</p> <p>I live in a rural community in Idaho with about 4,000 people.  Here are some of the issues in this community as reflected in statistics from the entire state of Idaho:</p> <ul> <li>Idaho has the 9<sup>th</sup> highest suicide rate in the nation</li> <li>Idaho ranks 4<sup>th</sup> nationwide for the non-medical use of prescription opioid painkillers</li> <li>Idaho ranks 3<sup>rd</sup> for criminal child pornography offenses</li> <li>Traffic accidents/injuries/deaths in this community frequently involve not stopping at stop signs and not wearing seat belts</li> </ul> <p>Those are harsh statistics and hard issues to address. Here are some positive statistics about the community and state:</p> <ul> <li>Idaho is the third most charitable state in the nation in terms of volunteerism and donating money</li> <li>Idaho rates first in the nation in child welfare systems (Right for Kids Ranking)</li> <li>Idaho has the 9<sup>th</sup> highest employment rate in the nation</li> </ul> <p>What do the statistics tell us about this community and state?  We’re generous, work hard, and take care of our families.  But we’re also stubborn and independent and don’t ask for help when we really need it!  How do we address these issues?</p> <p>The community leaders decided to begin by identifying the resources that we already have.  For example, we have three free resources for people with addictions but the resources are mostly invisible.  We need to make sure that they’re visible!  We can do that by widely disseminating information about resources.  We are also looking at raising money to fund a position to connect people needing help to the resources.</p> <p>The faith-based community is stepping up to provide resources.  Last year NFPN and local churches sponsored a Celebrate Families Day, providing free food, fun activities, and educational materials to children and parents.  We also sought donations for the local elementary school and everyone pitched in to fill a bus with backpacks and school supplies.</p> <p>This year we want to emphasize safety when students return to school.  We will do a kick-off in the fall that includes slogans such as Stop…in the name of love!</p> <p>My long-term vision for this community is to have a multi-purpose family center that includes activities for families, connection to services, counseling for individuals and the family as a whole, support groups, educational resources, etc.  Families are important and need a place to call their own!</p> <p>So, this summer, take a look at your community’s needs and see how you, your organization, other helping organizations, churches, etc. can join together to help meet the needs.  It will benefit both your community…and you!</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/07/13/helping-our-communities/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2016-07-13 15:42 +00:00 2016-07-13 08:42 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=402 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/06/21/building-resilience/ Other Building Resilience Last month the NFPN News Notes Blog featured the remarkable story of Terry Morris and how his resilience took him from a horribly abusive childhood to becoming a rocket engineer at NASA.  This month we look at how to build resilience. On the Harvard Business Review blog, John McKinley writes that when it comes to identifying leaders who &#8230; Tue, 21 Jun 2016 13:48:53 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/06/21/building-resilience/#respond admin <p>Last month the <em>NFPN News Notes Blog</em> featured the remarkable story of Terry Morris and how his resilience took him from a horribly abusive childhood to becoming a rocket engineer at NASA.  This month we look at how to build resilience.</p> <p>On the <em>Harvard Business Review</em> blog, John McKinley writes that when it comes to identifying leaders who can effect lasting social change, what matters most is resilience. According to McKinley, the three key characteristics of resilient leaders are:</p> <ol> <li><strong>Grit</strong>: Short-term focus on tasks at hand, a willingness to slog through broken systems with limited resources, and pragmatic problem-solving skills.</li> <li><strong>Courage</strong>: Action in the face of fear and embracing the unknown.</li> <li><strong>Commitment</strong>: Long-term optimism and focus on big-picture goals.</li> </ol> <p>To view the entire article, visit: <a href="https://hbr.org/2013/02/want-to-change-the-world-be-resilient">https://hbr.org/2013/02/want-to-change-the-world-be-resilient</a></p> <p>John McKinley says that &#8220;resilience can be trained.&#8221;  How might we go about training for resilience in our lives?</p> <p>The American Psychological Association lists 10 ways to build resilience and here are four of them:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Make connections.</strong> Good relationships with close family members, friends or others are important. Accepting help and support from those who care about you and will listen to you strengthens resilience.</li> <li><strong>Avoid seeing crises as insurmountable problems.</strong> You can&#8217;t change the fact that highly stressful events happen, but you can change how you interpret and respond to these events.</li> <li><strong>Accept that change is a part of living.</strong> Accepting circumstances that cannot be changed can help you focus on circumstances that you can alter.</li> <li><strong>Move toward your goals.</strong> Instead of focusing on tasks that seem unachievable, ask yourself, &#8220;What&#8217;s one thing I know I can accomplish today that helps me move in the direction I want to go?&#8221;</li> </ul> <p>To view the entire list, visit: <a href="http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/road-resilience.aspx">http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/road-resilience.aspx</a></p> <p>With resilience in our own lives, we are then in a position to help others build resilience. Kelly Wilson, a clinician with expertise in trauma treatment, says that to foster resilience in children, the primary factor is having caring and supporting relationships. There must be an environment of love, trust, and acceptance, and role models who offer encouragement and assistance.</p> <p>Factors that foster resilience in trauma-exposed children include:</p> <ul> <li>Able to ask adults for help</li> <li>Stable, nurturing parent or caretaker and extended family</li> <li>Supportive, positive school experiences</li> <li>Consistent family environment (structured routine, family traditions, etc.)</li> <li>Strong cultural connections and cultural identity</li> </ul> <p>To view Kelly’s PowerPoint (with excellent illustrations) on building resiliency so that children can thrive, visit <a href="http://helpkidsthrive.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Building-Resiliency-Thrive.pdf">http://helpkidsthrive.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Building-Resiliency-Thrive.pdf</a></p> <p>One measure of resiliency is the positive change experienced as a result of the struggle with a traumatic event.  The Post-traumatic Growth Research Group lists five factors of posttraumatic growth:</p> <ul> <li>Relating to others</li> <li>New possibilities</li> <li>Personal strength</li> <li>Spiritual change</li> <li>Appreciation for life</li> </ul> <p>A Posttraumatic Growth Inventory reflects these changes and is available here: <a href="http://www.emdrhap.org/content/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/VIII-B_Post-Traumatic-Growth-Inventory.pdf">http://www.emdrhap.org/content/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/VIII-B_Post-Traumatic-Growth-Inventory.pdf</a></p> <p><strong>Finally, check out the <em>Preserving Families Blog </em>that provides information on ground-breaking legislation for prevention services: <a href="https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/">https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/</a></strong></p> <p>Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/06/21/building-resilience/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2016-06-21 13:48 +00:00 2016-06-21 06:48 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=398 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/05/19/resilience/ Other Resilience The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) recently participated in a mental health summit in Jackson, MS. The theme was resilience and I have never seen a better match between theme and keynote speaker. Terry Morris was born in Chicago.  When Terry was 4 years old, his father deserted the family.  Terry was the spitting image &#8230; Thu, 19 May 2016 13:39:50 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/05/19/resilience/#respond pmartens <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) recently participated in a mental health summit in Jackson, MS. The theme was resilience and I have never seen a better match between theme and keynote speaker.</p> <p>Terry Morris was born in Chicago.  When Terry was 4 years old, his father deserted the family.  Terry was the spitting image of his father and Terry’s mother immediately began to blame her young son for all of her problems.  She beat Terry, calling him by his father’s name while doing so, often withheld food, and once pushed him off a three-story building.  If Terry brought home a B grade in school, his mother would force him to sleep outside in the cold for weeks at a time.  She did not treat Terry’s four siblings in the same way&#8212;Terry was the scapegoat for anything bad that happened in the family.</p> <p>As Terry began his teenage years, his mother decided to get rid of the cause of all her problems.  She drove Terry to Tupelo, MS, and dropped him off.  Terry lived in abandoned cars and foraged for food until he was finally discovered and placed in a boys’ home.</p> <p>Terry then began to attend school regularly.  He was given an IQ test which included recall of numbers.  Terry could recall a sequence of 54 numbers.  While he was still in high school, NASA called him.  He was placed in a special academy, graduated from college, and has worked as a rocket engineer at NASA for 30 years.  Terry is also a national speaker with numerous speaking engagements including the White House, Pentagon, FBI, CIA, National Institutes of Health, and many other venues.</p> <p>Throughout his childhood, Terry always believed that a better life awaited him. Here is what Terry shared about how he achieved resilience:</p> <ul> <li>Forgive: let go of past hurts</li> <li>Guard your heart from negative influence: don’t carry heavy baggage</li> <li>Let go of things that you cannot control</li> <li>There is a difference between striving and thriving</li> <li>Resilience is a mindset</li> </ul> <p>Terry credits God and the kindness of counselors with helping him obtain the better life that he so earnestly desired.  He is a humble man, quick to express gratitude to the people, programs, and the state that gave him a new life.  If you hear him speak, you will come away with a profound understanding of resilience and a different view of Mississippi!</p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>FREE RESOURCE!</strong></p> <p>The <em>Journal of Public Child Welfare </em>has produced a special issue on in-home services.  The issue has 7 articles and is available free until June 30 at this link: <a href="http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wpcw20/9/5">http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wpcw20/9/5</a>.    Two of the articles report on research findings on the NCFAS tools, including the initial field study of the Trauma/Post-Trauma Well-Being tool (see the articles by Kirk and Olsen, et. al.).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/05/19/resilience/feed/ 0 pmartens1 2016-05-19 13:39 +00:00 2016-05-19 06:39 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=394 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/04/20/fast-facts-about-nfpn/ Other Fast Facts about NFPN The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) was established in 1992.  Here are some fast facts about NFPN and where to find resources: The mission of NFPN is to serve as the primary national voice for the preservation of families. Our mission is achieved through initiatives in the areas of family preservation, reunification, father-involvement, and, more &#8230; Wed, 20 Apr 2016 15:30:24 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/04/20/fast-facts-about-nfpn/#respond pmartens <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) was established in 1992.  Here are some fast facts about NFPN and where to find resources:</p> <ul> <li>The mission of NFPN is to serve as the primary national voice for the preservation of families. Our mission is achieved through initiatives in the areas of family preservation, reunification, father-involvement, and, more recently, prevention and in-home services.</li> </ul> <p>For a detailed overview of NFPN and printable brochure, visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/about-nfpn">http://www.nfpn.org/about-nfpn</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>NFPN has offered family functioning assessment tools/training packages since 2002. For the past 10 years, sales of the NCFAS tools/training packages have been the primary source of revenue for NFPN.</li> </ul> <p>To view a list of all assessment tools, visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>In 2015 there were 180 inquiries on NCFAS assessment tools through the website’s automated price quote form.</li> </ul> <p>To receive an automated price quote on any of the assessment tools, complete the form at <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/assessment-tool-price-quote">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/assessment-tool-price-quote</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>NFPN has conducted 9 research studies in the past 15 years, developed a dozen training curricula and supporting resources, conducted 3 nationwide surveys of IFPS, and is providing online courses on family preservation/in-home services.</li> </ul> <p>To view the most recent research report, the successful field test of the Trauma/Post-Trauma Well-Being tool, visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/articles/trauma-report">http://www.nfpn.org/articles/trauma-report</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>NFPN’s website has averaged 13,500 visits annually  the past 5 years. NFPN offers over 60 resources on its website.</li> </ul> <p>For a birds-eye view of the resources on NFPN’s website, visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/nfpn-site-map">http://www.nfpn.org/nfpn-site-map</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>Since 2010 NFPN has provided fee-based training/technical assistance (T/TA) on assessment tools, IFPS, in-home services, and father-involvement.</li> </ul> <p>To arrange for T/TA contact <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>International sales have increased over the years, and there are now customers in 20 countries. One-third of assessment tool sales in 2015 were from international customers. The translation of the assessment tools/training packages into Spanish by a Chilean professor has resulted in numerous sales in Chile and some sales in other Spanish-speaking countries.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For information on the Spanish version assessment tools, visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/products/spanish-training">http://www.nfpn.org/products/spanish-training</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>NFPN publishes a Preserving Families Blog and a News Notes blog.</li> </ul> <p>Links to both blogs are on the website at <a href="http://www.nfpn.org">www.nfpn.org</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We’re here to serve&#8212;let us know how we can help meet your needs!</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/04/20/fast-facts-about-nfpn/feed/ 0 pmartens1 2016-04-20 15:30 +00:00 2016-04-20 08:30 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=391 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/03/29/resources-for-parents/ Other Resources for Parents The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) regularly hears from frantic parents who are facing termination of parental rights.  Generally, there is nothing that can be offered except a listening ear. What can we do to help parents earlier in the process before they face termination of their rights?  Let’s look at some resources that parents &#8230; Tue, 29 Mar 2016 13:44:36 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/03/29/resources-for-parents/#respond admin <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) regularly hears from frantic parents who are facing termination of parental rights.  Generally, there is nothing that can be offered except a listening ear.</p> <p>What can we do to help parents earlier in the process before they face termination of their rights?  Let’s look at some resources that parents and those who help parents may find helpful.</p> <p>Many states have an ombudsman’s office that investigates complaints from families receiving child protective, foster care, adoption, and juvenile justice services.  You can access a list of the child welfare state complaint/ombudsman offices here:</p> <p><a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/organizations/?CWIGFunctionsaction=rols:main.dspROL&amp;rolType=Custom&amp;RS_ID=%2031">https://www.childwelfare.gov/organizations/?CWIGFunctionsaction=rols:main.dspROL&amp;rolType=Custom&amp;RS_ID=%2031</a></p> <p>Parents Anonymous sponsors the National Parent Helpline with this description:</p> <p>The National Parent Helpline® is here for you and is open to parents and caregivers of children and youth of all ages.</p> <p>1-855- 4A PARENT (1-855-427-2736)<br /> HOURS OF OPERATION:<br /> Monday through Friday<br /> 10:00 AM PST to 7:00 PM PST</p> <p>A trained National Parent Helpline® Advocate is ready to:</p> <ul> <li>listen to you</li> <li>offer emotional support</li> <li>help you problem-solve</li> <li>support you in creating your own solutions</li> <li>encourage you to take care of yourself</li> <li>work with you to get connected to local services</li> <li>explore new resources for your family</li> <li>help you build on your own strengths and continue to be a great parent!</li> <li>visit the Helpline website at: <a href="http://www.nationalparenthelpline.org/">http://www.nationalparenthelpline.org/</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For parents whose children are in foster care with the goal of reunification, a half-dozen resources are available here: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/fostercaremonth/resources/parents/">https://www.childwelfare.gov/fostercaremonth/resources/parents/</a></p> <p>A new resource, the Birth Parent National Network, is working to promote and champion birth parents as leaders and strategic partners in prevention and child welfare systems reform.  You can find more information here:  <a href="http://bpnn.ctfalliance.org/">http://bpnn.ctfalliance.org/</a></p> <p>The Child Welfare Information Gateway has numerous resources for parents and those helping parents including tips for parents, understanding developmental stages, child safety, nutrition, finding help, etc.   Here’s the place to start:  <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/preventing/promoting/parenting/">https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/preventing/promoting/parenting/</a></p> <p>Finally, there is a magazine and a book that will be of interest to both parents and their advocates.  <em>Rise </em>magazine gives voice to parents. For 10 years Rise has worked with parents to write and share their stories in order to deepen understanding of fragile families, provide information, healing and encouragement to parents, and guide child welfare professionals in becoming more responsive to the families and communities they serve.  Visit the website: <a href="http://www.risemagazine.org/rise-magazine/">http://www.risemagazine.org/rise-magazine/</a></p> <p>David Tobis, a prior board member of the National Family Preservation Network, has published a book, <em>From Pariahs to Partners: How Parents and their Allies Changed New York City’s Child Welfare System. </em>New York City had one of the worst child welfare systems in the United States: 50,000 children were in foster care; they and their families were often neglected or abused by the system; parents had no voice; and the services designed to protect children were more often harming, rather than helping, them.  <em>From Pariahs to Partners</em> tells for the first time the inspiring story of the parents and their allies&#8211;child welfare commissioners, social workers, lawyers, and foundation officers&#8211;who joined together to change the system.  You can order the book here:</p> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Pariahs-Partners-Parents-Changed-Welfare/dp/0195099885/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1458741556&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=from+pariahs+to+partners">http://www.amazon.com/Pariahs-Partners-Parents-Changed-Welfare/dp/0195099885/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1458741556&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=from+pariahs+to+partners</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/03/29/resources-for-parents/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2016-03-29 13:44 +00:00 2016-03-29 06:44 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=388 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/02/24/predicting-risk/ Other Predicting Risk Predictive analytics is a current hot topic.  In simplest terms, it’s a method for predicting the future based on past data.  Predictive analytics is used in insurance, banking, marketing, telecommunications, travel, healthcare, pharmaceuticals, and, increasingly, social services as large amounts of data are becoming more available. The most challenging use of predictive analytics is predicting &#8230; Wed, 24 Feb 2016 15:37:27 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/02/24/predicting-risk/#respond admin <p>Predictive analytics is a current hot topic.  In simplest terms, it’s a method for predicting the future based on past data.  Predictive analytics is used in insurance, banking, marketing, telecommunications, travel, healthcare, pharmaceuticals, and, increasingly, social services as large amounts of data are becoming more available.</p> <p>The most challenging use of predictive analytics is predicting risk of child abuse and neglect.</p> <p>Over 1500 children die each year from child abuse and neglect.   About 70% are children under the age of 3 with almost three-quarters of the deaths resulting from neglect.  Identified risk factors include substance abuse by parents and prior contact with child welfare system. More details are available in the report <em>Child Maltreatment 2014.  </em>The report also includes a helpful chart showing the disposition of the 3.6 million annual referrals for child abuse and neglect.</p> <p>U.S. Department of Health &amp; Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children’s Bureau. (2016). <em>Child maltreatment 2014</em>. Available from <a href="http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/research-data-technology/statistics-research/child-maltreatment">http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/research-data-technology/statistics-research/child-maltreatment</a></p> <p>The <em>Chronicle of Social Change </em>is a top source of information on predictive analytics in the child welfare system.  The <em>Chronicle </em>has reported on the following tools that are used to predict risk with child abuse and neglect cases:</p> <p>In Florida, Eckerd’s Rapid Safety Feedback (ERSF) tool was developed as a result of child deaths in open child welfare cases.  Cases often involved small children and substance abuse. Analytics now identify a high risk case which is reviewed by a person not assigned to the case.  Critical protective factors include information sharing across systems, supervisory reviews, safety plans, and quality of contacts with families.  There have been no child deaths since implementation three years ago while there were 9 deaths in the three years before.  Use of the tool is being expanded to 5 other states.</p> <p>Los Angeles County has the largest child welfare system in the world with 220,000 complaints annually.  The county contracted with SAS to develop risk modeling. Dubbed AURA, or Approach to Understanding Risk Assessment, the model tracked child deaths, near fatalities, and “critical incidents” in 2011 and 2012.  Risk scores were assigned from 1-1,000.  AURA could identify child deaths and near child deaths that had occurred but also identified false positives in which there were no subsequent critical events.  Use of the model has become very controversial.  In addition to false positives, opponents also base objections on concerns of profiling and disproportionality.</p> <p>Allegheny County, PA, has one of the most effective child welfare systems in the nation (see <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/articles/monograph-an-effective-child-welfare-system">http://www.nfpn.org/articles/monograph-an-effective-child-welfare-system</a>) and is also one of the most advanced in terms of predictive analytics.  The county integrates data from other systems along with the child welfare system   based on a tool developed in New Zealand.  The findings are not the sole determinant of risk but one of the tools used by social workers in decision-making.</p> <p>For more information on the development and use of predictive analytics in the child welfare system, see a sampling of articles at: <a href="https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/?s=predictive+analytics">https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/?s=predictive+analytics</a>.</p> <p>Over on the <em>Preserving Families Blog</em> the conversation is about safety.  Visit: <a href="https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/">https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/</a></p> <p><strong>NFPN’s online courses for in-home services will include training on risk and safety.  The three courses are scheduled for March 10, 17, and 24 at 10:30 a.m. Central Time. The cost is $50 per course or all three courses for $100. You can register by contacting NFPN’s Executive Director, Priscilla Martens, director@nfpn.org. One prerequisite is current use (or purchase) of the NCFAS-G or NCFAS-G+R assessment tool. Participants will receive a Certificate of Completion.</strong><strong>  </strong></p> <p>Priscilla Martens, NFPN Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/02/24/predicting-risk/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2016-02-24 15:37 +00:00 2016-02-24 07:37 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=386 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/01/20/new-year-new-resources/ Other New Year–New Resources The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is kicking off the new year with some new resources in addition to our ongoing resources: NFPN has a new blog, Preserving Families.  The content will differ from the NFPN News Notes so readers are encouraged to follow both blogs.  You can access the blogs from the home page &#8230; Wed, 20 Jan 2016 14:46:08 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/01/20/new-year-new-resources/#respond admin <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is kicking off the new year with some new resources in addition to our ongoing resources:</p> <p><strong>NFPN has a new blog, <em>Preserving Families.</em></strong><em>  </em>The content will differ from the <em>NFPN News Notes </em>so readers are encouraged to follow both blogs.  You can access the blogs from the home page of the website, <a href="http://www.nfpn.org">www.nfpn.org</a>. Use this link to directly access <em>Preserving Families Blog: </em> <a href="https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/">https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/</a></p> <p>The new blog will cover all in-home services, including preventive services, as well as services to avert out-of-home placement and to reunify families following placement.</p> <p><em>Preserving Families</em> begins the year with a focus on practitioner training.  NFPN is offering online courses on family preservation and in-home services. The trainer, Sheila Searfoss, has a wealth of knowledge and experience providing training in the state of Missouri on Intensive Family Preservation Services and in-home services.</p> <p>A series of three courses will be offered with the first set scheduled for March 10, 17, and 24 at 10:30 a.m. Central Time.  The cost will be $50 per course or you can take all three courses for $100.  Register by contacting NFPN’s Executive Director, Priscilla Martens, <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a>.  For a description of courses, visit the <em>Preserving Families Blog, </em><a href="https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/">https://preservingfamiliesblog.wordpress.com/</a>.</p> <p><strong>NFPN has published a new fatherhood report</strong>, <em>Integrating and Sustaining Father Involvement. </em>This is NFPN’s 7<sup>th</sup> publication on father involvement.  It summarizes 15 years of observations and review of research findings, and culminates in the urgent call to integrate and sustain father involvement in programs, policies, and practice.  NFPN is seeking agencies that would like to partner with us to develop a model for integrating and sustaining father involvement in best practice.  To read the report, visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/sustaining-father-inv">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/sustaining-father-inv</a>.   If you’re interested in partnering with NFPN on this issue, contact <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a>.</p> <p>To view <em>all </em>of NFPN’s father involvement resources visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement</a>.</p> <p><strong>NFPN continues to offer top-ranked assessment tools</strong> that measure family functioning.  The NCFAS family of tools are in use by over 1,000 agencies in 20 countries.  Last year one-third of the agencies purchasing the tools were from outside the U.S. The most recent version of the tool, Trauma/Post-Trauma Well-Being was released in 2015, and a research report on the findings has been published in the <em>Journal of Public Child Welfare.  </em>To obtain information on all of the assessment tools visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools</a>.</p> <p><strong>Training and Technical Assistance are available </strong>on all of NFPN’s products.  NFPN is moving to online training to expand our reach and to meet the demands of agencies for a quick response to training needs.  Please let us know if we can be of assistance for training and technical assistance.</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2016/01/20/new-year-new-resources/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2016-01-20 14:46 +00:00 2016-01-20 06:46 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=382 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/12/16/highlights-of-2015/ Other Highlights of 2015 &#160; The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) accomplished the following during the past year: Released a new assessment tool, Trauma and Post-Trauma Well-Being, to assist workers to identify symptoms and indicators of trauma and to determine the level of recovery and healing following services. In the field test, trauma was identified in 80% of the &#8230; Wed, 16 Dec 2015 14:27:07 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/12/16/highlights-of-2015/#respond admin <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) accomplished the following during the past year:</p> <ul> <li>Released a new assessment tool, Trauma and Post-Trauma Well-Being, to assist workers to identify symptoms and indicators of trauma and to determine the level of recovery and healing following services. In the field test, trauma was identified in 80% of the families referred through the child welfare system.  Parents had more trauma symptoms and indicators than children.  Both parents and children showed significant improvement following services.</li> </ul> <p>For more information about the tool and to read the field test report, visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/trauma-assessment-tool">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/trauma-assessment-tool</a>.</p> <ul> <li>Released a Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) instrument for Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS). The CQI instrument allows states and contracted providers, through the case review process, to determine if they are meeting best practice standards for IFPS, including safety, permanency, and well-being of children and families.  The instrument is low-priced and includes supporting materials.  For more information, visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/cqi-ifps-instrument">http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/cqi-ifps-instrument</a>.</li> <li>Sent the assessment tools to schools. NFPN worked with a number of school programs to introduce or expand use of the NCFAS assessment tools.  The state of Alabama will use the NCFAS-G statewide in their Helping Families Initiative to address student truancy and behavior problems. For more information on this program, visit: <a href="http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/local/progress/2014/10/25/helping-families-celebrates-years-schools/17912589/">http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/local/progress/2014/10/25/helping-families-celebrates-years-schools/17912589/</a>.</li> <li>Began development of online courses for in-home services. NFPN has received many requests for low-cost training on family preservation and in-home services.  We will begin offering courses online early next year.  Stay tuned!</li> </ul> <p>There is still time to make end-of-year purchases of any of NFPN’s products. For a complete list and description, visit: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/products.aspx">http://www.nfpn.org/products.aspx</a>.</p> <p>Last, but most important, thank you for serving families, supporting NFPN, and standing for those who cannot stand alone.</p> <p>Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/12/16/highlights-of-2015/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2015-12-16 14:27 +00:00 2015-12-16 06:27 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=379 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/11/18/federal-resources/ Other Federal Resources With Thanksgiving approaching, the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is sharing a list of federal resources for which we can all be grateful! Child Welfare Information Gateway (https://www.childwelfare.gov):  This resource, a service of the Children’s Bureau, connects professionals and the public to print and electronic publications, websites, databases, and online learning tools for improving child &#8230; Wed, 18 Nov 2015 15:14:17 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/11/18/federal-resources/#respond admin <p>With Thanksgiving approaching, the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is sharing a list of federal resources for which we can all be grateful!</p> <p><strong>Child Welfare Information Gateway (</strong><a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov">https://www.childwelfare.gov</a>)<strong>:  </strong>This resource, a service of the Children’s Bureau, connects professionals and the public to print and electronic publications, websites, databases, and online learning tools for improving child welfare practice.</p> <p>There are seven free subscriptions available at the Gateway, including a daily listing of news articles that are of interest to the child welfare field: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/subscribe/">https://www.childwelfare.gov/subscribe/</a>.    Another useful resource is the issue briefs that provide information in a nutshell on a variety of topics including in-home services, reunification, trauma-informed practice, parent education, etc.: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/catalog/serieslist/?CWIGFunctionsaction=publicationCatalog:main.dspSeriesDetail&amp;publicationSeriesID=8">https://www.childwelfare.gov/catalog/serieslist/?CWIGFunctionsaction=publicationCatalog:main.dspSeriesDetail&amp;publicationSeriesID=8</a>.</p> <p><strong>Federal funding</strong> is critically important as a driver of philosophy, policies, and programs at the state and local level. For many years federal funding has been targeted primarily to services following removal of a child from the home.  In recent years the federal government has sought ways to target more dollars to keeping children safely in their own homes.  One way of moving more dollars to the front end of the system is temporary waivers that 29 states have been using to help families stay together.  A more comprehensive approach is legislation (S.1964, H.R. 3781) introduced by Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon which would be a permanent source of funding for front-end services.</p> <p>The services would be time-limited (12 months), evidence-based, and include two nationwide performance measures: prevention of placement and permanent placement as measured by the number of children in foster care who are returned to their parents, adopted, or placed with kin.  The bill also provides for mandatory funding of Title IV-B (discretionary amounts currently determined by Congress) and increases the total amount to $1 billion annually which includes funding for family preservation programs. Thus, this legislation fits well with family preservation and reunification policies and programs.  For an excellent summary of the legislation prepared by the Children’s Defense Fund, visit: <a href="http://www.childrensdefense.org/library/data/summary-of-the-family.pdf">http://www.childrensdefense.org/library/data/summary-of-the-family.pdf</a>.</p> <p>Members of Congress will be home soon for the holiday break and you can let your senator and representatives know how this legislation would impact your agency and the families that you serve.</p> <p>The <strong>Capacity Building Center for States </strong>has replaced the federal national resource centers.  Its purpose is to help public child welfare organizations and professionals build the capacity necessary to strengthen, implement, and sustain effective child welfare practice and achieve better outcomes for children, youth, and families.  For more information visit <a href="https://capacity.childwelfare.gov/states/">https://capacity.childwelfare.gov/states/</a>.</p> <p>The final resource is an <strong>Implementation Guidebook </strong>whose stated purpose is to provide an easy-to-use tool for implementing a parenting intervention.  But it’s actually a tool for implementation of many kinds of programs as it’s one of the clearest and most detailed guides on implementation that has been published.  You can read it here: <a href="http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/resource/implementing-parenting-interventions-in-early-care-and-education-settings-a-guidebook-for-implementation">http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/resource/implementing-parenting-interventions-in-early-care-and-education-settings-a-guidebook-for-implementation</a>.</p> <p>In closing <strong>Happy Thanksgiving to All </strong>and here is a link to the history of Thanksgiving that includes a nifty video: <a href="http://www.history.com/topics/thanksgiving/history-of-thanksgiving">http://www.history.com/topics/thanksgiving/history-of-thanksgiving</a>.</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, Executive Director</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/11/18/federal-resources/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2015-11-18 15:14 +00:00 2015-11-18 07:14 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=377 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/10/28/a-tale-of-two-children/ Other A Tale of Two Children Meet Tony and Kylie.  We’re going to look in on them at various stages of their lives ranging from birth to age 26: Tony (infancy): Following birth, Tony goes home with his mom and dad.  He is breastfed and grows quickly.  By the age of one, tests show that Tony has advanced cognitive skills.  He &#8230; Wed, 28 Oct 2015 15:54:19 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/10/28/a-tale-of-two-children/#respond admin <p><strong>Meet Tony and Kylie.  We’re going to look in on them at various stages of their lives ranging from birth to age 26:</strong></p> <p><strong>Tony (infancy):</strong> Following birth, Tony goes home with his mom and dad.  He is breastfed and grows quickly.  By the age of one, tests show that Tony has advanced cognitive skills.  He shows no fear and learns quickly.  His mom says that Tony’s dad is a good father. Tony enjoys nightly wrestling with his dad.</p> <p><strong>Kylie (infancy):</strong> Following birth, Kylie goes home with her mom.  Kylie’s mom and dad dated for a few months prior to the pregnancy.  Kylie’s dad moved out of town before Kylie was born.  He has never had contact with Kylie and does not pay child support.  Kylie’s mom is depressed following the birth.  She bottle-feeds Kylie who cries a lot and seems distressed and anxious.  By the age of one, Kylie has been to the emergency room several times for injuries related to falls and burns.</p> <p><strong>Tony (elementary school):</strong> Tony loves school and earns mostly “A” grades.  He is a self-starter and behaves well.  He has many friends.</p> <p><strong>Kylie (elementary school):</strong> Kylie misses a lot of school due to asthma attacks and dislikes school when she is there.  She has low self-esteem, is impulsive, and frequently misbehaves.  She earns mostly “C” grades along with a few “D” grades.  She has few friends.</p> <p><strong>Tony (high school):</strong> Tony takes advanced placement classes.  He enjoys playing sports and is well-liked.  By his junior year, Tony is trying to decide which college he would like to attend.</p> <p><strong>Kylie (high school):</strong>  Kylie is a year behind, having flunked fourth grade.  She is aggressive and has had several suspensions for fighting.  Kylie steals her mom’s prescription drug that her mom takes for depression.  Kylie enjoys partying with her friends and frequently skips school with them.  By her junior year, Kylie is pregnant and drops out of school.</p> <p><strong>Tony (age 26):</strong> Tony has graduated from college at the top of his class.  He has a good-paying job in finance.  He has many friends and enjoys recreational sports.  Tony volunteers as a Big Brother once a week.  Tony is engaged to be married and plans to buy a house within a year.</p> <p><strong>Kylie (age 26):</strong> Kylie lives with her mom who helps care for Kylie’s now 10-year old daughter.  Kylie still struggles with low self-esteem. She has held a series of fast-food restaurant jobs but clashes frequently with other employees and her boss.  Kylie has just learned that she is pregnant. She plans to marry the father, a high-school dropout, who works at a fast-food restaurant.</p> <p>Do you know what factor is most highly associated with the good outcomes for Tony and the poor outcomes for Kylie?</p> <p>Is there any intervention that might have changed the poor outcomes for Kylie?</p> <p>Is there anything that you can do now to prevent future Kylies from having the same poor outcomes?</p> <p>While you’re thinking about these questions, here’s the source of the outcomes for Tony and Kylie: <a href="http://www.fira.ca/cms/documents/29/Effects_of_Father_Involvement.pdf">http://www.fira.ca/cms/documents/29/Effects_of_Father_Involvement.pdf</a></p> <p>And, here are some resources that practitioners can use to help future Kylie’s: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/10/28/a-tale-of-two-children/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2015-10-28 15:54 +00:00 2015-10-28 08:54 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=374 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/09/16/schools-and-social-work/ Other Schools and Social Work September is back-to-school month. All of us are invested in the goal of teachers, students, administrators, and support staff being successful at school!  While the fields of education and social work may not always be viewed as interrelated, let’s take a closer look to see if they are: Did you know that the Child Abuse &#8230; Wed, 16 Sep 2015 13:55:52 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/09/16/schools-and-social-work/#respond admin <p>September is back-to-school month. All of us are invested in the goal of teachers, students, administrators, and support staff being successful at school!  While the fields of education and social work may not always be viewed as interrelated, let’s take a closer look to see if they are:</p> <p>Did you know that the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA-Part C) requires states to refer all children under age 3 involved in a substantiated case of child abuse/neglect to early intervention services?  About 3% of all children under age 3 in the U.S. are referred for these services.  The child is first assessed to determine if there are factors that would contribute to developmental delay. If so, a family assessment is completed along with a plan for appropriate services. Schools are involved in providing the services. For more detailed information on CAPTA-Part C visit <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/partc.pdf">https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/partc.pdf</a>.</p> <p>Did you know that there is a school targeted to the child welfare system?  Two-thirds of the students at Mott Haven Charter Academy in the Bronx are actively involved in the child welfare system.  There are two social workers available to meet the needs of both the student and the family. The Interdisciplinary Social Emotional Behavior Intervention Team assesses the potential causes of academic difficulty and then institutes an action plan for success.  In addition, the student/teacher ratio of 12:1, extra time devoted to reading and math, and after-school instruction all contribute to high proficiency in reading and math.  For more information, visit <a href="https://www.nyfoundling.org/program/haven-academy/">https://www.nyfoundling.org/program/haven-academy/</a>.</p> <p>Did you know that an estimated 15-20% of students have a clinically significant behavioral and/or emotional disorder?  So, in a classroom of 25 students, up to 5 of the students are struggling with barriers to learning that affect not only these students but other students and the teacher as well.  Best practice today is to address these issues with a multidisciplinary team that includes social workers.  A functional behavioral assessment is conducted and then an intervention plan is developed.  Specific interventions are targeted to teaching strategies that will produce desired behavior.  For example, pictures may be used to help students identify emotions and how to express and cope with them.  For excellent overviews of school behavior/emotional issues and effective programs, visit</p> <p><a href="https://www.district287.org/uploaded/A_Better_Way/EffectiveProgramsforEmotionalandBehavioralDisordersHanover2013.pdf">https://www.district287.org/uploaded/A_Better_Way/EffectiveProgramsforEmotionalandBehavioralDisordersHanover2013.pdf</a>  and  <a href="http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/6AA00136-AE40-4976-947C-CF10EB3D5C20/0/InterventionGuide.pdf">http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/6AA00136-AE40-4976-947C-CF10EB3D5C20/0/InterventionGuide.pdf</a>.</p> <p>Did you know that attendance in the first 20 days of an academic period serves as a good indicator for students who are likely to drop out or fail to graduate?  Research shows that the following contribute to reducing absenteeism:</p> <ul> <li>Making home visits to families of chronically absent students;</li> <li>Rewarding students for improved attendance;</li> <li>Establishing a contact person at school for parents to work with;</li> <li>Calling home when students are absent;</li> <li>Conducting workshops for families about attendance;</li> <li>Referring chronically absent students to counselors;</li> <li>Offering after-school programs</li> <li>Using a truant officer to work with problem students and families.</li> </ul> <p>For an overview on prevention of truancy and absenteeism, visit <a href="http://www.doe.in.gov/student-services/attendance/preventing-chronic-absenteeism-truancy">http://www.doe.in.gov/student-services/attendance/preventing-chronic-absenteeism-truancy</a>.</p> <p>Did you notice from these examples that there is a lot of intersecting of social work with schools?  Another theme that has been repeated in the examples is <em>assessment</em> of students/families.  The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is working to expand use of the NCFAS-G assessment tool into schools.  There are a number of schools nationwide that use the tool and there have been several evaluations on use of the tool in schools.  NFPN is seeking partners to conduct additional evaluations and to develop a protocol for use of the assessment tool in schools.  If you are currently using or plan to use the NCFAS-G with school programs, please contact NFPN.</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, Executive Director</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/09/16/schools-and-social-work/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2015-09-16 13:55 +00:00 2015-09-16 06:55 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=370 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/08/26/free-resources/ Other Free Resources Periodically, the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) compiles a list of free resources on cutting-edge topics.  Even in an age when every topic can be googled, it’s still handy to have a quick reference guide! It is challenging to decide which resources will be of the most interest and benefit to our constituency.  Because many &#8230; Wed, 26 Aug 2015 14:14:32 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/08/26/free-resources/#respond admin <p>Periodically, the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) compiles a list of free resources on cutting-edge topics.  Even in an age when every topic can be googled, it’s still handy to have a quick reference guide!</p> <p>It is challenging to decide which resources will be of the most interest and benefit to our constituency.  Because many of our readers serve families in the child welfare system, that was selected as the basic category. Within the overarching category of child welfare, recurring themes are trauma, well-being, underlying issues affecting child abuse/neglect (substance abuse, mental health, domestic violence), and intervention (engagement, parenting skills). Those themes make up the bulk of the resources listed along with some very current related topics on trafficking of vulnerable children, federal funding policy, and quality assurance.</p> <p>All of the resources can be found on the internet and links are provided.  Keep in mind that links frequently work for only a limited time, so be sure to save documents to your computer that you want to keep for long-term reference.</p> <p>It is NFPN’s hope that you will find these resources useful.  We also hope that you regularly share resources with your colleagues at work, through social media, and at every opportunity.  We all benefit from sharing!</p> <p>Here is the list divided into categories. Note that the Child Welfare Information Gateway is often included in links as it’s a prime source of connecting professionals to comprehensive resources to help protect children and strengthen families: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/">https://www.childwelfare.gov/</a></p> <p><strong>Trauma</strong></p> <p>Developing a trauma-informed child welfare system: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/trauma_informed.pdf">https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/trauma_informed.pdf</a></p> <p>Parenting a child who has experienced trauma: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/child-trauma.pdf">https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/child-trauma.pdf</a></p> <p>Trauma-informed practice (13 hours of free online training-Child Welfare Trauma Training Toolkit): <a href="http://www.nctsnet.org/products/child-welfare-trauma-training-toolkit-2008">http://www.nctsnet.org/products/child-welfare-trauma-training-toolkit-2008</a></p> <p><strong>Substance Abuse, Mental Health, Domestic Violence</strong></p> <p>Parental substance abuse and the child welfare system: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/parentalsubabuse.pdf">https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/parentalsubabuse.pdf</a></p> <p>Effective policies for parental substance abuse: <a href="http://childwelfaresparc.org/brief-state-level-policy-advocacy-for-children-affected-by-parental-substance-use/">http://childwelfaresparc.org/brief-state-level-policy-advocacy-for-children-affected-by-parental-substance-use/</a></p> <p>Supporting infants, toddlers, and families impacted by mental health problems substance abuse, and trauma: <a href="http://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA12-4726/SMA12-4726.pdf">http://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA12-4726/SMA12-4726.pdf</a></p> <p>Domestic violence and the child welfare system: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/domestic-violence.pdf">https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/domestic-violence.pdf</a></p> <p><strong>Child Well-Being and Youngest Children</strong></p> <p>Are the children well? Promoting mental wellness: <a href="http://www.rwjf.org/en/library/research/2014/07/are-the-children-well-.html">http://www.rwjf.org/en/library/research/2014/07/are-the-children-well-.html</a></p> <p>Best Practice and research on the youngest children (Zero to Three): <a href="http://www.zerotothree.org/public-policy/">http://www.zerotothree.org/public-policy/</a></p> <p><strong>Family Engagement and Parenting</strong></p> <p>Family engagement overview: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/f_fam_engagement.pdf">https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/f_fam_engagement.pdf</a></p> <p>Parent education to strengthen families and reduce risk of maltreatment: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/parented.pdf">https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/parented.pdf</a></p> <p>Coparenting: <a href="http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1000">http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1000</a></p> <p><strong>Cultural Competence</strong></p> <p>Culturally responsive child welfare practice: <a href="http://cascw.umn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/CW360-Winter2015.pdf">http://cascw.umn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/CW360-Winter2015.pdf</a></p> <p><strong>Trafficking</strong></p> <p>Child welfare and human trafficking: <a href="https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/trafficking.pdf">https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/trafficking.pdf</a></p> <p><strong>Federal funding</strong></p> <p>Newly proposed federal funding policy for prevention: <a href="http://citylimits.org/2015/08/19/turnaround-looms-in-federal-funding-to-prevent-child-abuse-neglect/">http://citylimits.org/2015/08/19/turnaround-looms-in-federal-funding-to-prevent-child-abuse-neglect/</a></p> <p><strong>Quality Service Reviews</strong></p> <p>Steps to determining the quality of case practice (note especially the appendices):  <a href="http://www.cssp.org/publications/child-welfare/document/quality-service-reviews-mechanism-for-case-level-advocacy-system-reform-web.pdf">http://www.cssp.org/publications/child-welfare/document/quality-service-reviews-mechanism-for-case-level-advocacy-system-reform-web.pdf</a></p> <p>Priscilla Martens, Executive Director</p> <p>National Family Preservation Network</p> <p><strong> </strong></p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/08/26/free-resources/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2015-08-26 14:14 +00:00 2015-08-26 07:14 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=363 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/07/22/coparenting/ Other father involvement Coparenting The May 2015 Zero to Three Journal focuses on supporting fathers and mothers as coparents.  Although referring to parents of infants in the mental health system, the articles are applicable to parents of children of all ages in all systems.  Here’s what I think gets to the heart of the matter as quoted from the &#8230; Wed, 22 Jul 2015 15:41:53 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/07/22/coparenting/#respond pmartens <p>The May 2015 <em>Zero to Three Journal </em>focuses on supporting fathers and mothers as coparents.  Although referring to parents of infants in the mental health system, the articles are applicable to parents of children of all ages in all systems.  Here’s what I think gets to the heart of the matter as quoted from the first article by James P. McHale and Vicky Phares:  “In jurisdictions across the United State, fathers are still often seen as trespassers in work with mothers and infants.  Instead of adopting the posture: ‘Where is the child’s father?  We cannot begin work without him.  Let’s redouble our energies to get him in here, engage with him, help him understand that our efforts on behalf of his baby will not succeed without him,’ infant mental health professionals reflexively accept that he is not their target.”   That statement could readily be applied to many other child/family-serving systems, including the child welfare system.</p> <p>But why? Why, after all these years of an ever-increasing body of knowledge of the importance of fathers, numerous fatherhood initiatives and programs, and federal grants to fund Responsible Fatherhood programs are fathers still viewed as “trespassers?”  McHale and Phares list the following reasons:</p> <ul> <li>Fathers who do not provide financial support for their children are viewed as untrustworthy and underserving</li> <li>Female providers are not comfortable working with men</li> <li>The “men’s movement” is associated with possessive, controlling, and domineering fathers</li> <li>Fathers are not necessary</li> </ul> <p>However, the authors then cite some compelling studies that support father inclusion:</p> <ul> <li>Mothers with post-partum depression heal better when fathers are engaged in the treatment</li> <li>Better outcomes for children are dependent on family functioning that includes fathers</li> <li>A program that videotapes both fathers and mothers playing with their children has demonstrated improved parenting confidence as well as improved coparenting communication</li> </ul> <p>If you’re like me, this is the first time that you’ve heard of these studies. That’s because we’re more likely to be social workers than psychologists and these studies are from the field of psychology.  In fact the cutting-edge research on coparenting is being produced largely by psychologists.  Dr. McHale and Dr. Phares are psychologists at the University of South Florida.  There are two couples who also are instrumental in coparenting research, three psychologists and one psychiatrist:  Dr. Philip and Dr. Carolyn Pape Cowan and Dr. Kyle Pruett (psychiatrist) and Dr. Marsha Kline Pruett.  The research findings of all have a strong common thread: the involvement of both parents in their children’s lives or working with “the father and mother together—always together.”  For more information on father involvement in the field of psychology, visit <a href="http://www.usfsp.edu/fsc/research/figuring-it-out-for-the-child/">http://www.usfsp.edu/fsc/research/figuring-it-out-for-the-child/</a>  and <a href="http://www.familyresourcecenters.net/.../Phase-IV-final-report-text-plus-tables/">http://www.familyresourcecenters.net/&#8230;/Phase-IV-final-report-text-plus-tables/</a>.</p> <p>How do we as social workers ignite coparenting?  Framing father involvement as coparenting is certainly one way, and note that coparents may also include kin, step-parents, foster parents, etc.  A successful coparenting movement will require a concerted effort that includes joining forces across industries and systems, finding new sources of funding, identifying and scaling up effective models (the Responsible Fatherhood programs have not yet produced definitive findings or models), addressing the primarily female workforce perspective, and promoting coparenting in all forms of media.</p> <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) has promoted father involvement for the past 15 years and is happy to join the coparenting movement.  NFPN has a free resource to assist child welfare agencies to meet the federal Child and Family Services Reviews (CFSR) standards for father involvement:  <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/Portals/0/Documents/cfsr_father_involvement.pdf">http://www.nfpn.org/Portals/0/Documents/cfsr_father_involvement.pdf</a>.   A good overview of federal fatherhood funding is available here:  <a href="https://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL31025.pdf">https://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL31025.pdf</a>. Another free resource is best practice on visitation between non-resident fathers and their children: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/father-child-visits">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/father-child-visits</a>.</p> <p>NFPN has some of the few research-based curricula for training practitioners on father involvement.  The curricula were field-tested with child welfare social workers and there were significant changes following training.  For information on the curricula, visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/basic-training-package">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/basic-training-package</a>.    Complete this form to obtain a price quote: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/fatherhood-form">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/fatherhood-form</a>.   The curricula are also available as three online courses: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/online-courses">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/online-courses</a>.   An updated Complete Guide to Father Involvement with links to over 30 resources is a good starting place for information: <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/guide-to-father-inv">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/guide-to-father-inv</a>.    The Guide is free with purchase of either the Basic or Advance Fatherhood Training Curricula.</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, Executive Director</p> <p>National Family Preservation Network</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/07/22/coparenting/feed/ 0 pmartens1 2015-07-22 15:41 +00:00 2015-07-22 08:41 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=358 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/06/17/nas-and-tough-love/ Other NAS and Tough Love There are two timely topics in this issue of News Notes—best get started! NAS In recent years there has been a substantial increase in prescription drug abuse and that has been paralleled by an increase in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).  NAS refers to the withdrawal symptoms experienced by infants exposed to drugs.  From 55% to &#8230; Wed, 17 Jun 2015 14:34:46 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/06/17/nas-and-tough-love/#respond pmartens <p>There are two timely topics in this issue of News Notes—best get started!</p> <p><strong>NAS</strong></p> <p>In recent years there has been a substantial increase in prescription drug abuse and that has been paralleled by an increase in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).  NAS refers to the withdrawal symptoms experienced by infants exposed to drugs.  From 55% to 90% of infants will experience withdrawal at birth following exposure to drugs passed from mother to infant in the womb.</p> <p>Some symptoms of withdrawal in babies may include:</p> <ul> <li>Tremors (trembling)</li> <li>Irritability (excessive and high-pitched crying)</li> <li>Sleep problems</li> <li>Tight muscle tone</li> <li>Vomiting</li> <li>Poor feeding</li> <li>Stuffy nose, sneezing</li> <li>Fever or unstable temperature</li> </ul> <p>States are seeing significant increases in the numbers of NAS infants.  Tennessee has seen a ten-fold increase in the past 10 years.  The cost of stabilizing a newborn with NAS is about $63,000 in Tennessee.  One-fourth of newborns diagnosed with NAS are placed in state custody within one year of birth.</p> <p>It is critical to prepare the parents for the baby’s discharge.  Infants may experience withdrawal symptoms for up to six months and parents describe this time as an “emotional roller coaster.”  The Wisconsin Association for Perinatal Care has a helpful guide for parents available here: <a href="http://www.perinatalweb.org/assets/cms/uploads/files/Methadone_Guide%20for%20Parents_2013_v4.pdf">http://www.perinatalweb.org/assets/cms/uploads/files/Methadone_Guide%20for%20Parents_2013_v4.pdf</a>.  There is also a guide for service providers: <a href="http://www.perinatalweb.org/assets/cms/uploads/files/Methadone_Facts%20for%20Providers_2013_v4.pdf">http://www.perinatalweb.org/assets/cms/uploads/files/Methadone_Facts%20for%20Providers_2013_v4.pdf</a>.</p> <p>A good overview of NAS nationwide and treatment protocols is available here: <a href="http://www.astho.org/Prevention/NAS-Neonatal-Abstinence-Report/">http://www.astho.org/Prevention/NAS-Neonatal-Abstinence-Report/</a>.</p> <p>The federal SAMHSA agency provides the Screening and Assessment for Family Engagement, Retention, and Recovery (SAFERR) model. The SAFERR model promotes a coordinated approach involving the child welfare system, drug and alcohol services, and the courts and is available here: <a href="https://www.ncsacw.samhsa.gov/files/SAFERR.pdf">https://www.ncsacw.samhsa.gov/files/SAFERR.pdf</a>.</p> <p><strong>Tough Love</strong></p> <p>On July 6, PBS will broadcast “Tough Love.”  The documentary follows two families, one in Seattle and one in New York, in which the parent is trying to reunite with children placed in foster care. Children in both families were removed due to neglect with substance abuse also a factor in one of the families.</p> <p>“I hope <strong>Tough Love</strong> gives audiences a glimpse of the lives inside the child-welfare system, the lives of the families and workers who spend countless hours navigating this complex bureaucracy,” says filmmaker Stephanie Wang-Breal. “At the end of the day, it is a system made of people. People who are faced with complex issues like housing, welfare, domestic violence and substance abuse. People who have to overcome unimaginable obstacles to have a family again.</p> <p>“Too often, adoption is seen as the only option for children in foster care. Through Hannah, Philly and Patrick’s stories, I hope to show audiences that these children have parents who love them and are willing to do whatever it takes to get them home.”</p> <p>NFPN is pleased to be included in the list of PBS resources for families and is happy to spread the word about the film.  Save the date of July 6 and check your local listings for the time.  You can also help spread the word through use of the PBS Partner Toolkit available here: <a href="http://www.pbs.org/pov/toughlove/partner_toolkit.php">http://www.pbs.org/pov/toughlove/partner_toolkit.php</a>.</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, Executive Director</p> <p>National Family Preservation Network</p> <p>director@nfpn.org    888-498-9047</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/06/17/nas-and-tough-love/feed/ 0 pmartens1 2015-06-17 14:34 +00:00 2015-06-17 07:34 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=349 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/05/06/online-courses-survey/ Other Online Courses Survey Did you know that the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) was in the vanguard when we first offered online courses six years ago? Did you know that there are over 600 online course vendors today? Did you know that 60% of the nation’s 4000 colleges/universities offer online degree programs? Did you know that just one &#8230; Wed, 06 May 2015 15:57:57 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/05/06/online-courses-survey/#respond admin <p>Did you know that the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) was in the vanguard when we first offered online courses six years ago? Did you know that there are over 600 online course vendors today? Did you know that 60% of the nation’s 4000 colleges/universities offer online degree programs? Did you know that just one university—Arizona State University—offers 70 degree programs online?   You can even obtain a Masters of Business Administration (MBA) degree online!</p> <p>If none of this information comes as a surprise to you, then you’re well informed when it comes to online courses. But for many of us the explosion of online courses in recent years comes as more of a shock that is difficult to comprehend.</p> <p>Here are some reasons why online courses have become so prevalent:</p> <ul> <li>Convenient</li> <li>Work at your own pace</li> <li>Earn CEU’s for ongoing education</li> <li>Engaging</li> <li>Quick way to gain specific knowledge</li> <li>Low cost</li> </ul> <p>What about an online degree closer to home? For example, can you obtain a social work degree online? Absolutely! A quick google reveals over 50 colleges and universities offering online degrees in social work. You can also obtain ongoing education in social work although it may be challenging to find a specific course that fits your exact needs. A starting place is the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) that has just launched a new online continuing education resource for social workers, the Professional Education and Training Center (<a href="http://www.naswdc.org/pdev/default.asp">http://www.naswdc.org/pdev/default.asp</a>).</p> <p>And, what does NFPN plan for future online courses? We are considering additional online courses on father involvement and first-ever online courses for Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS). Especially in the child welfare field, involving fathers appears to have stalled. One reason is that most of the father involvement curricula are, perhaps understandably, from a male perspective. However, the child welfare field is overwhelmingly female in both work force and head of household. Maybe it’s time to address that issue with a course on The Female Perspective on Father Involvement. How does that sound to you?</p> <p>IFPS services are offered in most states but training for staff is generally available only when IFPS is offered statewide.  NFPN provides the IFPS ToolKit but that is more of a resource for establishing IFPS programs. There are currently no online courses for IFPS. Is there interest out there in taking online courses for IFPS?</p> <p>NFPN would like to know what online courses subject matter is of interest to you. To provide NFPN with input and feedback on online courses, please take the 7-question survey at this link: <a href="https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/RCVLFDR">https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/RCVLFDR</a>  It will take only a few minutes to complete and the information will be priceless! Thank you.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/05/06/online-courses-survey/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2015-05-06 15:57 +00:00 2015-05-06 08:57 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=345 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/03/25/50-resources/ IFPS Info & Resources Reunification Trauma 50 Resources Over the past 15 years, the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) has developed 50 resources for family-serving agencies. While all of the resources are available on our website (nfpn.org), that’s a lot of information to digest at one time! So this newsletter will provide you with an overview of these resources, note some new ones &#8230; Wed, 25 Mar 2015 13:00:02 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/03/25/50-resources/#respond admin <p>Over the past 15 years, the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) has developed 50 resources for family-serving agencies.</p> <p>While all of the resources are available on our website (<a href="http://nfpn.org/" target="_blank">nfpn.org</a>), that’s a lot of information to digest at one time! So this newsletter will provide you with an overview of these resources, note some new ones that have just been released, and provide links to them so that you can quickly find what you’re looking for. Information is also included on training/technical assistance.</p> <h3><strong><span class="subtitle">What does NFPN do?</span></strong></h3> <p>The mission of NFPN is to serve as the primary national voice for the preservation of families. Our mission is achieved through initiatives in the areas of family preservation, reunification, and father-involvement. NFPN offers research-based tools, training, resources, and technical assistance. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/about-nfpn" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/about-nfpn</a>.</p> <h3><strong><span class="subtitle">What are the most popular resources that NFPN offers?</span></strong></h3> <p><strong>1. Assessment Tools that Measure Family Functioning</strong><br /> Over 800 agencies in the USA and 20 other countries use these assessment tools:<br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools</a></p> <p><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong><em>New! </em></strong></span><em>Trauma/Post-Trauma Well-Being Tool and Training Package (T/WB)</em><br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/trauma-assessment-tool" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/trauma-assessment-tool</a></p> <p><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong><em>New! </em></strong></span><em>Two Spanish Version Assessment Tools : NCFAS-G+R and T/WB</em><br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/products/spanish-training" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/products/spanish-training</a></p> <p><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong><em>New!</em></strong></span><em> Assessment Tool Database</em>s<br /> The NCFASGRT Data Entry System Version 1 is now available for the NCFAS-G, NCFAS-G+R, and T/WB assessment tools, as well as the T/WB combined with either the NCFAS-G or NCFAS-G+R. The database has been rebuilt from the ground up to provide better long-term stability and functionality. The new database prints family assessments with comments, provides two new additional reporting features (baseline/strengths and problem areas), and includes instructions for installing the database on a server. The NCFASGRT database is included with a new purchase of an assessment tool training package (English version) from NFPN. Database upgrades are available to current licensed users of the NCFAS-G or NCFAS-G+R. The cost to upgrade is $75.<br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/ncfasgrt-database" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/assessment-tools/ncfasgrt-database</a></p> <p><strong>2. Building and Strengthening Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS) Programs</strong></p> <p><em>IFPS ToolKit</em><br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/ifps-toolkit" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/ifps-toolkit</a></p> <p><em>IFPS Nationwide Survey</em><br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/2014-ifps-survey" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/2014-ifps-survey</a></p> <p><em><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>New!</strong> </span>Continuous Quality Improvement Instrument for IFPS (CQI-IFPS)</em><br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/cqi-ifps-instrument" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/cqi-ifps-instrument</a></p> <p><em>IFPS Blog</em><br /> <a href="http://www.intensivefamilypreservation.org/blog/" target="_blank">http://www.intensivefamilypreservation.org/blog/</a></p> <p><strong>3. Cutting-Edge Information and Free Resources</strong><br /> <em>NFPN Blog</em><br /> <a href="https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com" target="_blank">https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com</a></p> <p><em>Other Free Resources including:</em></p> <ul> <li>12 articles on timely topics</li> <li>Father-involvement video clips (may be used in presentations by permission)</li> <li>Training video on <em>Listening and the Six Stages of Change</em></li> </ul> <p><a href="http://www.nfpn.org/free-resources" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/free-resources</a></p> <h3><strong><span class="subtitle">Ready to take the plunge?</span></strong></h3> <p>If you would like to view all of NFPN’s products, visit:<br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/products.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/products.aspx</a></p> <h3><strong><span class="subtitle">How about training and technical assistance?</span></strong></h3> <p>NFPN offers onsite training-of-trainers, most frequently for large agencies and for research projects that use one or more of our resources.</p> <p><em><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Coming Soon!</strong></span> Onsite training for trauma-informed practice</em></p> <p>Please <a href="http://nfpn.org/contact" target="_blank">contact NFPN</a> if you are interested in onsite training. NFPN can provide technical assistance by phone/e-mail for any of our resources. Note: We’re looking for partners, especially universities and colleges, to collaborate with in order to offer more online training.</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/03/25/50-resources/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2015-03-25 13:00 +00:00 2015-03-25 06:00 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=340 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/02/04/new-assessment-tool-for-trauma-and-well-being/ Trauma New Assessment Tool for Trauma and Well-Being Following two years of development and field-testing, the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is pleased to offer the first-of-its-kind assessment tool for Trauma and Post-Trauma Well-Being. The two Trauma/Well-Being (T/WB) domains now join 10 other domains in the North Carolina Family Assessment Scale (NCFAS) family of tools. Trauma Domain The Trauma domain assists workers to &#8230; Wed, 04 Feb 2015 14:00:25 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/02/04/new-assessment-tool-for-trauma-and-well-being/#respond admin <p>Following two years of development and field-testing, the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is pleased to offer the first-of-its-kind assessment tool for Trauma and Post-Trauma Well-Being. The two Trauma/Well-Being (T/WB) domains now join 10 other domains in the North Carolina Family Assessment Scale (NCFAS) family of tools.</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Trauma Domain</span></h3> <p>The <em>Trauma</em> domain assists workers to become aware of the symptoms and indicators of trauma and to assess for trauma and the degree of severity.</p> <p>The <em>Trauma</em> domain comprises the following subscales:</p> <ul> <li>Traumatic Sexual Abuse of Child(ren)</li> <li>Traumatic Physical Abuse of Child(ren)</li> <li>Traumatic Neglect of Child(ren)</li> <li>Traumatic Emotional/Psychological Abuse of Child(ren)</li> <li>Parent/Caregiver Trauma</li> <li>Overall Trauma</li> </ul> <h3><span class="subtitle">Post-Trauma Well-Being Domain</span></h3> <p>The <em>Post-Trauma Well-Being</em> domain is distinguished from the NCFAS <em>Child Well-Being</em> domain in that it focuses specifically on recovery and healing of children after trauma has occurred, on the status of the parent/caregiver following trauma to the parent/caregiver and/or the child, and on the parent/caregiver’s ability to support the child during the recovery/healing period.</p> <p>The <em>Post-Trauma Well-Being</em> domain comprises the following subscales:</p> <ul> <li>Post-Traumatic Cognitive and Physical Well-Being of Child(ren)</li> <li>Post-Traumatic Emotional/Psychological Well-Being of Child(ren)</li> <li>Post-Traumatic Social Functioning of Child(ren)</li> <li>Post-Trauma Parent/Caregiver Support of Child(ren)</li> <li>Post-Trauma Parent/Caregiver Well-Being</li> <li>Overall Post-Trauma Well-Being</li> </ul> <h3><span class="subtitle">Field-Test Findings</span></h3> <p>NFPN, in cooperation with Dr. Ray Kirk, conducted a field-test study on the T/WB domains with stellar results. The domains were found to have high statistical reliability and convergent validity with the other NCFAS domains. Families made substantial progress following treatment for trauma symptomology.</p> <p>The following charts are a summary of the findings:</p> <p><strong>Intake/Pre-Serve Assessment</strong></p> <table border="1" width="450" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td><strong>Assessment Results</strong></td> <td><strong>Families</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>At least one <em>Trauma</em> subscale in the problem range (-1, -2, -3)</td> <td>81%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>At or above Baseline/Adequate on all subscales (0, +1, +2)</td> <td>19%</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong>   </strong></p> <table border="1" width="452" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td><strong>Subscale</strong></td> <td><strong>Families with Mild Problem Rating</strong> <strong>(-1)</strong></td> <td><strong>Families with Moderate or Serious Problem Ratings</strong> <strong>(-2, -3)</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Traumatic Sexual Abuse of Children</td> <td>7%</td> <td>6%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Traumatic Physical Abuse of Children</td> <td>9%</td> <td>11%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Traumatic Neglect of Children</td> <td>23%</td> <td>21%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Emotional/Psychological Abuse of Children</td> <td>27%</td> <td>21%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Parent/Caregiver Trauma</td> <td>20%</td> <td>37%</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong>Closure/Post-Service Assessment</strong></p> <table border="1" width="452" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td><strong>Subscale</strong></td> <td><strong>Families with Mild Problem Rating</strong> <strong>(-1)</strong></td> <td><strong>Families with Moderate or Serious Problem Ratings</strong> <strong>(-2, -3)</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Post-Trauma Cognitive/Physical Well-Being of Children</td> <td>—</td> <td>10% (Mild/Moderate)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Post-Trauma Emotional/Psychological Well-Being of Children</td> <td>8%</td> <td>4%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Post-Trauma Parent/Caregiver Well-Being</td> <td>13%</td> <td>12%</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>To read the complete field-test report, visit:<br /> <a href="http://nfpn.org/trauma-report" target="_blank">http://nfpn.org/trauma-report</a></p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Should workers assess for trauma if no trauma services are available?</span></h3> <p>In order to effectively help families, any trauma affecting family members must be identified. In addition, federal and state policies require family-serving agencies to address trauma. At a minimum, all workers need to be trained in trauma-informed practice.</p> <p>NFPN has developed a guide for <em>Trauma-Informed Practice</em> that provides information and links to free resources to assist workers in obtaining basic initial training.</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">T/WB Training Package</span></h3> <p><strong>What is included in the T/WB Training Package?</strong></p> <ul> <li>Trauma and Post-Trauma Well-Being Scale and Definitions</li> <li>Assessment Forms</li> <li>Guide for Trauma-Informed Practice</li> <li>PowerPoint for Training Workers</li> <li>Case Study with Recommended Ratings and Case Planning Form</li> <li>Frequently Asked Questions (F.A.Q.)</li> <li>Database for Electronic Entry of Ratings (available in March)</li> <li>Instruction Manuals</li> </ul> <p><strong>Who may use the Trauma/Post-Trauma Well-Being Tool?</strong></p> <ul> <li>Any agency or individual currently authorized to use one of the NCFAS tools is eligible to purchase the T/WB.</li> <li>The T/WB may be combined with the purchase of a NCFAS-G or NCFAS-G+R Assessment Tool Training Package.</li> <li>NCFAS and NCFAS-R users may upgrade to the NCFAS-G or NCFAS-G+R with the T/WB domains at a discounted price.</li> <li>NFPN recommends that workers have experience using other NCFAS domains before being trained on the T/WB.</li> </ul> <p><strong>How do I obtain the Trauma/Post-Trauma Well-Being Tool and Training Package?</strong></p> <ol> <li>Complete the assessment tool inquiry form to obtain an automated price quote:<br /> <a href="http://nfpn.org/assessment-tool-price-quote" target="_blank">http://nfpn.org/assessment-tool-price-quote</a></li> <li>After receiving the automated price quote, reply to the e-mail to request an invoice.</li> <li>Pay the invoice online by credit card or send a check to NFPN. NFPN is going paperless and you can save money by downloading all materials. Printed materials are available for an additional printing/shipping/handling fee.</li> </ol> <h3 class="Default"><span class="subtitle">Special Introductory Offer—February Only</span></h3> <p class="Default">All orders for the T/W Training Package that are paid in February include a <strong>free</strong> NCFAS-G or NCFAS-G+R Database that combines with the T/WB Database for seamless data entry of all the ratings. The new databases will be released in March.</p> <p class="Default"><a href="http://nfpn.org/assessment-tool-price-quote" target="_blank">http://nfpn.org/assessment-tool-price-quote</a></p> <h2 class="Default"><span class="subtitle">Coming in March:</span></h2> <ul> <li class="Default">New databases for data entry of ratings on the T/WB, NCFAS-G, and NCFAS-G+R assessment tools</li> <li class="Default">Spanish version of the T/WB Training Package</li> </ul> <h3 class="Default"><span class="subtitle">Questions? </span></h3> <p class="Default">Please contact:<br /> Priscilla Martens, Exec. Dir.<br /> National Family Preservation Network<br /> 888-498-9047<br /> <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a></p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/02/04/new-assessment-tool-for-trauma-and-well-being/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2015-02-04 14:00 +00:00 2015-02-04 06:00 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=336 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/01/07/new-resource/ IFPS Info & Resources New Resource Happy New Year! The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is entering the new year at full speed. We’re excited to kick off 2015 by sharing about our new resources. Our current resources include assessment tools, father-involvement training curricula, research and practice documents, and training/technical assistance. For more information on all of our resources visit NFPN.org. &#8230; Wed, 07 Jan 2015 14:00:56 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/01/07/new-resource/#respond admin <h3><span class="subtitle">Happy New Year!</span></h3> <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) is entering the new year at full speed. We’re excited to kick off 2015 by sharing about our new resources. Our current resources include assessment tools, father-involvement training curricula, research and practice documents, and training/technical assistance. For more information on all of our resources visit <a href="http://www.nfpn.org" target="_blank">NFPN.org</a>.</p> <p>NFPN is introducing two new resources in the first two months of 2015. This month NFPN is introducing a quality improvement instrument, and next month NFPN will introduce two new assessment domains: Trauma and Post-Trauma Well-Being.</p> <p>Today, NFPN is pleased to announce the release of a Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Instrument for use with Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS).</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Importance of CQI</span></h3> <p>The federal Administration for Children and Families—Children’s Bureau defines Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) as the complete process of identifying, describing, and analyzing strengths and problems and then testing, implementing, learning from, and revising solutions.</p> <p>The Children’s Bureau addresses quality assurance (QA) of state child welfare agencies through Child and Family Services Reviews (CFSR). During the first round of reviews conducted from 2001 to 2004, the Children’s Bureau found that 31 states had QA systems. That number increased to 40 states in the second round of reviews conducted from 2007 to 2010.</p> <p>The Children’s Bureau further lists five key components of an effective CQI system:</p> <ul> <li>A strong foundational administrative structure</li> <li>Quality data collection</li> <li>An effective case record review process</li> <li>Process to analyze and disseminate data</li> <li>Processes to provide feedback to stakeholders/decision-makers and adjust programs and process</li> </ul> <p>The complete memorandum is available at:<br /> <a href="http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/im1207.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/im1207.pdf</a></p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Purpose of CQI for IFPS</span></h3> <p>One essential component of an effective child welfare system is Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS). Thus, it is critical to maintain and improve the quality of IFPS programs on an ongoing basis. The CQI-IFPS Instrument allows states and contracted providers, through the case review process, to determine if they are meeting best practice for IFPS and that includes the safety, permanency, and well-being of children and families. The CQI instrument assists in determining what is currently being done well along with identifying areas that need improvement in the future.</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Components of the CQI-IFPS Instrument</span></h3> <p>The CQI-IFPS Instrument is grounded in many years of research on IFPS. Each item of the Instrument has been carefully selected and field-tested.</p> <p>The CQI-IFPS Instrument and supporting materials including:</p> <ul> <li>Introduction (Definition, Basis in federal law/policy, and Purpose of IFPS CQI)</li> <li>CQI-IFPS Instrument (10 domains covering a total of 75 items)</li> <li>Tally Sheet (Checklist for case reviewers that allows tallying of up to 5 case files)</li> <li>Directions for Use (Preparation, Reviewing Case Files, Debriefing, Using Findings to Guide Improvement in Practice)</li> <li>Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)</li> </ul> <p>The following is a portion of the Tally Sheet showing how the instrument is used and scored:</p> <p><a href="https://nfpnnewsnotes.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/cqi-ifps-tally-sheet-sample.png"><img data-attachment-id="338" data-permalink="https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/01/07/new-resource/cqi-ifps-tally-sheet-sample/" data-orig-file="https://nfpnnewsnotes.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/cqi-ifps-tally-sheet-sample.png" data-orig-size="1063,510" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}" data-image-title="CQI-IFPS Tally Sheet Sample" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://nfpnnewsnotes.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/cqi-ifps-tally-sheet-sample.png?w=300" data-large-file="https://nfpnnewsnotes.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/cqi-ifps-tally-sheet-sample.png?w=600&#038;h=288" class="alignnone wp-image-338 size-large" src="https://nfpnnewsnotes.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/cqi-ifps-tally-sheet-sample.png?w=600&#038;h=288" alt="CQI-IFPS Tally Sheet Sample" width="600" height="288" srcset="https://nfpnnewsnotes.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/cqi-ifps-tally-sheet-sample.png?w=600&amp;h=288 600w, https://nfpnnewsnotes.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/cqi-ifps-tally-sheet-sample.png?w=150&amp;h=72 150w, https://nfpnnewsnotes.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/cqi-ifps-tally-sheet-sample.png?w=300&amp;h=144 300w, https://nfpnnewsnotes.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/cqi-ifps-tally-sheet-sample.png?w=768&amp;h=368 768w, https://nfpnnewsnotes.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/cqi-ifps-tally-sheet-sample.png?w=1024&amp;h=491 1024w, https://nfpnnewsnotes.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/cqi-ifps-tally-sheet-sample.png 1063w" sizes="(max-width: 600px) 100vw, 600px" /></a></p> <p>NFPN recommends that IFPS programs be operational for at least one year prior to using the CQI instrument.</p> <h3 class="Default"><span class="subtitle">Pricing</span></h3> <p class="Default">The CQ-IFPS Instrument is affordably priced, ranging from $125 for small private agencies to $250 for large private and government agencies. You may order and pay online with access to the instrument and resource materials immediately following payment.</p> <h3 class="Default"><a href="http://nfpn.org/cqi-ifps" target="_blank"><span class="subtitle">Order Today!</span></a></h3> <p class="Default">To get started, visit: <a href="http://nfpn.org/cqi-ifps" target="_blank">http://nfpn.org/cqi-ifps</a></p> <p class="Default">If you have questions or need more information, contact <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a> or phone 888-498-9047.</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2015/01/07/new-resource/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast CQI-IFPS Tally Sheet Sample 2015-01-07 14:00 +00:00 2015-01-07 06:00 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=334 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/highlights-of-2014/ Other Highlights of 2014 Last chance to save before prices go up in 2015. Order before December 19 to secure the lowest prices on NFPN&#8217;s Assessment Tool Training Packages. The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) has had a busy and productive year. Here are the highlights of achievements: 1. A comprehensive research study with a number of “firsts” including: &#8230; Wed, 10 Dec 2014 14:00:27 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/highlights-of-2014/#respond admin <table width="85%" cellpadding="10" align="center" bgcolor="#C5D1E9"> <tbody> <tr> <td align="left"><strong>Last chance to save before prices go up in 2015.</strong> <a href="http://nfpn.org/products" target="_blank">Order before December 19</a> to secure the lowest prices on NFPN&#8217;s Assessment Tool Training Packages.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) has had a busy and productive year. Here are the highlights of achievements:</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">1. A comprehensive research study with a number of “firsts” including:</span></h3> <ul> <li>First NFPN research study to incorporate all 3 of our initiatives in the areas of family preservation, reunification, and father involvement.</li> <li>First time the NCFAS-G assessment tool was tested with Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS) with excellent results.</li> <li>First time that exit instruments aligned questions for both the worker and parents with the NCFAS assessment tools. There is very close alignment between worker and parental perspective when families complete services.</li> <li>Concrete services, step-down services, and father involvement all contribute to longer-lasting family reunifications.</li> </ul> <p>To read the full research report, visit:<br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/reunification/reunification-research">http://www.nfpn.org/reunification/reunification-research</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">2. IFPS 40th Anniversary</span></h3> <p>The 40th Anniversary of Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS) was recognized with:</p> <ul> <li>A gala event in Seattle.</li> <li>An updated IFPS Nationwide Survey featuring 12 exemplary states providing IFPS services to over 11,000 families.</li> <li>Creation of an IFPS website to serve as a: <ul> <li>repository for the history of IFPS,</li> <li>resource for the field, and</li> <li>host for the IFPS Coast-to-Coast Blog.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p>See the IFPS Nationwide Survey:<br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/2014-ifps-survey">http://www.nfpn.org/preservation/2014-ifps-survey</a></p> <p>Visit the IFPS Website:<br /> <a href="http://www.intensivefamilypreservation.org/">http://www.intensivefamilypreservation.org/</a></p> <p>Read the IFPS Blog:<br /> <a href="http://www.intensivefamilypreservation.org/blog" target="_blank">http://www.intensivefamilypreservation.org/blog</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">3. Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Instrument for IFPS</span></h3> <p>NPFN has developed and field-tested a CQI instrument for IFPS. The instrument is designed for use with review of case files to assess both strengths and weaknesses of IFPS programs.</p> <p>The CQI-IFPS instrument will be released in January, 2015, and will include a training package with detailed instructions for use. Plan now to purchase this low-cost instrument to ensure the quality of your IFPS program.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">4. New additions to the NCFAS assessment tools</span></h3> <p>Two new domains, trauma and post-trauma well-being, have been developed and field-tested this year with outstanding results.</p> <p>The research study is currently being written and release of the new domains is scheduled for February, 2015. The new domains with accompanying training package will be offered as a stand-alone product and will be available only to agencies that have purchased one of the NCFAS assessment tools.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Year-End Savings</span></h3> <p><strong>Time is short to purchase products this year, and prices will increase on January 1. </strong>If you’ve been considering purchasing any of the assessment tools, doing so now will save you money plus you will be eligible to purchase the new trauma domains early next year.</p> <p><strong>To receive 2014 pricing, orders must be placed and paid by Friday, December 19</strong>. Online payment by credit card greatly speeds up turnaround to ensure delivery before the end of the year. Please contact NFPN immediately if you wish to take advantage of this year-end savings.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span class="subtitle"><strong>Thank you for all of your work on behalf of families.</strong><br /> <span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!</strong></span></span></h3> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/highlights-of-2014/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2014-12-10 14:00 +00:00 2014-12-10 06:00 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=331 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/11/12/female-perspective-on-father-involvement/ Father Involvement Female Perspective on Father Involvement NOTE: Prices for NFPN&#8217;s Father Involvement Training Packages and Assessment Tool Training Packages will increase in January. Order now to save money with free shipping/handling available through November 25. In 2001, the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) published the first-of-its-kind Basic Fatherhood Training Curriculum. Within a few years, family-serving systems appeared to embrace father involvement. &#8230; Wed, 12 Nov 2014 14:00:06 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/11/12/female-perspective-on-father-involvement/#respond admin <table width="85%" cellpadding="10" align="center" bgcolor="#C5D1E9"> <tbody> <tr> <td align="left"><strong>NOTE:</strong> Prices for NFPN&#8217;s Father Involvement Training Packages and Assessment Tool Training Packages will increase in January. <a href="http://nfpn.org/products" target="_blank">Order now</a> to save money with free shipping/handling available through November 25.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>In 2001, the National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) published the first-of-its-kind <em>Basic Fatherhood Training Curriculum. </em>Within a few years, family-serving systems appeared to embrace father involvement. National fatherhood organizations and initiatives flourished. NFPN received a large grant, partnering with two child welfare agencies in a successful research study of father involvement.</p> <p>But in this decade national fatherhood organizations have shrunk, there are very few initiatives, and funding has dried up. The momentum on father involvement has stalled. What could have caused that? Is it possible that more support is needed from . . . females?</p> <p>Let’s take a closer look at father involvement from a female perspective.</p> <h3>What Mothers Say</h3> <p>The National Fatherhood Initiative conducted a nationwide survey in 2009 on mothers. The following chart shows mothers’ responses and, where available, the responses from fathers in a similar survey:</p> <p><em>Mama Says Survey (2009)</em></p> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td></td> <td style="width:120px;"><strong>Mothers Agree</strong></td> <td style="width:120px;"><strong>Fathers Agree</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Fathers generally get a lot of respect for being fathers.</td> <td style="width:120px;">76%</td> <td style="width:120px;">92%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>The media tend to portray fathers in a negative light.</td> <td style="width:120px;">55%</td> <td style="width:120px;">65%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>When men first become fathers, they usually feel adequately prepared for fatherhood.</td> <td style="width:120px;">32%</td> <td style="width:120px;">54%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Mothers and fathers usually parent in about the same way.</td> <td style="width:120px;">16%</td> <td style="width:120px;">Not available</td> </tr> <tr> <td>I am a positive influence on the ability of the father of my child to be a good dad.</td> <td style="width:120px;">86%</td> <td style="width:120px;">Not available</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>The last item is especially noteworthy: mothers are confident that they exert positive influence on the ability of fathers to be good dads.</p> <p>You can find the entire survey here:<br /> <a href="http://www.fatherhood.org/mama-says-survey" target="_blank">http://www.fatherhood.org/mama-says-survey</a></p> <h3>Attitudes and Beliefs of Social Workers</h3> <p>Let’s look next at the attitudes and beliefs of those who work with fathers in the child welfare system.</p> <p>In the two child welfare agencies participating in NFPN’s research study on father involvement, over 75% of the social workers were women. A pre/post survey found significant differences after social workers received training and coaching on father involvement. Social workers were:</p> <ul> <li>More likely to think the father should be involved even if the mother was not favorable to his involvement.</li> <li>More likely to believe fathers should have the same visitation rights as mothers.</li> <li>Less likely to link visitation rights with father’s payment of child support.</li> <li>More likely to equally consider both biological parents and their extended families as placement resources.</li> <li>More likely to view mothers as helpful in locating biological fathers.</li> </ul> <p>Women make up a large majority of the workforce that serves families. Thus the female worker’s perspective can be just as critical as the mother’s in determining the extent to which the worker will help the father to be involved with his child.</p> <p>In a more recent survey, NFPN asked Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS) workers the extent to which they involved fathers in the intervention. IFPS workers spend a large amount of time with families, usually 40 hours or more over the course of the intervention. The workers knew the identity of the father 75% of the time. But only half the time workers</p> <ul> <li>knew where the father lived,</li> <li>established contact with him,</li> <li>involved the father in the case plan and services, and</li> <li>involved the father in connecting with the child.</li> </ul> <p>What were the barriers for the other half of the time when there was little engagement of fathers? Three of the four top reasons involved decisions primarily by females:</p> <ul> <li>The mother refused to identify the father.</li> <li>The mother revealed the identity of the father but did not want him involved.</li> <li>The referring worker did not require the father’s involvement.</li> </ul> <p>Mothers and female workers are often intentionally making a decision not to involve the father. So, what happens when the opposite takes place, that is, when mothers and workers intentionally make a decision to support the father’s involvement?</p> <h3>Partnering for Father Involvement</h3> <p>In an aptly named research study, <em>Supporting Father Involvement: An Intervention for Low-Income Families</em>, mostly Mexican-American and some Anglo married/cohabiting couples were randomly assigned to either a father’s group (minimal participation by mothers) or a couple’s group (full participation by mothers). Overall, the couples’ group had the best outcomes, including an increase in father involvement and reduction of stress between fathers and mothers.</p> <p>Where is all of this leading? Perhaps to re-thinking father involvement. If female support is a necessary ingredient to father involvement, then we need to know more about the female perspective at every junction.</p> <p><strong>NFPN is seeking a partnering agency (preferably city, county, or state wide) to further explore the female perspective in father involvement</strong>. A funding source will need to be identified and we are also looking for media coverage. Please contact NFPN (<a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org" target="_blank">director@nfpn.org</a>) if you consider your agency a potential partner.</p> <h3>Father Involvement Training</h3> <p>NFPN offers Basic and Advanced Fatherhood Training Curricula that have been used to train a largely female workforce on involving fathers. To get started, complete the pricing inquiry form at:<br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/fatherhood-price-quote" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/fatherhood-price-quote</a></p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/11/12/female-perspective-on-father-involvement/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2014-11-12 14:00 +00:00 2014-11-12 06:00 -08:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=327 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/10/08/resources-and-savings-2/ IFPS Info & Resources Trauma Resources and Savings Assessment Tools NFPN’s premier resources are assessment tools that measure family functioning. The tools are evidence-based with established reliability and validity. They are used in a wide variety of systems and programs: Home Visiting Head Start Schools Differential Response Child Welfare IFPS Juvenile Justice Mental and Behavioral Health Substance Abuse Drug Courts … and many &#8230; Wed, 08 Oct 2014 13:00:18 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/10/08/resources-and-savings-2/#respond admin <h3><span class="subtitle">Assessment Tools</span></h3> <p>NFPN’s premier resources are assessment tools that measure family functioning. The tools are evidence-based with established reliability and validity. They are used in a wide variety of systems and programs:</p> <ul> <li>Home Visiting</li> <li>Head Start</li> <li>Schools</li> <li>Differential Response</li> <li>Child Welfare</li> <li>IFPS</li> <li>Juvenile Justice</li> <li>Mental and Behavioral Health</li> <li>Substance Abuse</li> <li>Drug Courts … and many others.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Where and How Do Agencies Use the Assessment Tools?</span></h3> <p>1. Over 775 agencies nationwide and in 19 other countries use the assessment tools.</p> <p>2. The states of Florida and Pennsylvania have the highest use of the tool in the USA, while Australia and Canada rank highest internationally.</p> <p>3. Overall, 60% of agencies purchase the NCFAS-G (general services) and 40% purchase the NCFAS-G+R (general services and reunification). Large agencies, including two statewide agencies, use the NCFAS-G+R.</p> <p>4. Agencies report that the most valuable training package items are:</p> <ul> <li>PowerPoint for training workers,</li> <li>Case Example with recommended ratings,</li> <li>Work sheets for case planning and goal setting, and</li> <li>FAQs.</li> </ul> <p>5. Over 40% of agencies use the database included in the training package for computer entry of scale ratings, while 22% use their own data entry system, and 27% use only the paper form.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Buy Now to Save Money</span></h3> <p>The price of the assessment tools has remained the same for the past five years, even as costs increase to develop, test, produce, and ship them. Thus, it’s necessary to increase the price of the training packages in 2015.</p> <p>Purchasing this year will save you money—and you can save even more with free shipping on orders placed by November 25.</p> <p>Now is also the time to upgrade tools. If your agency purchased any NCFAS tool in the past 12 years, you’re eligible for a 20% discount on the NCFAS-G and NCFAS-G+R tools/training packages.</p> <p>Get started here:<br /> <a href="http://nfpn.org/assessment-tools" target="_blank">http://nfpn.org/assessment-tools</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">New Trauma Domains</span></h3> <p>NFPN is currently completing field-testing and analysis of trauma and post-trauma well-being domains. These new domains, to be released early in 2015, will bring to an even dozen the number of domains for the NCFAS assessment tools. All federally funded programs and many state funded programs require contracted agencies to address trauma and child well-being. NFPN believes that the trauma and post-trauma well-being domains will be the first-of-their-kind to address these critical issues.</p> <p>Based on customer preference, NFPN will provide the new domains as a stand-alone training package. Current use of the NCFAS assessment tools is a requirement for purchasing the new domains. Agencies should ensure that workers have experience using the current NCFAS tools before introducing the new domains.</p> <p>You can help speed your purchase of the new domains next year by locating your current license for the NCFAS tools, or the original invoice, or the year in which the tool(s) was purchased. If you haven’t yet purchased the NCFAS tools, now is the time!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Father Involvement Resources</span></h3> <p>NFPN provides training for practitioners to help them involve fathers in their children’s lives. The Basic and Advanced fatherhood training curricula include:</p> <ul> <li>Script/Training Guide</li> <li>Curriculum Manual</li> <li>Video</li> <li>Case Examples</li> <li>Agency Self-Assessment</li> <li>Activities for Fathers and Children</li> <li>Overcoming Obstacles &#8230; and much more.</li> </ul> <p>You can find complete details on NFPN’s fatherhood resources and obtain a price quote at:<br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement</a></p> <p>NFPN also offers the fatherhood curricula as online courses. Recently there has been an uptick in the number of workers taking the courses online—it’s a quick and easy way to obtain father involvement training and earn CEU’s:<br /> <a href="http://nfpn.academy.reliaslearning.com/" target="_blank">http://nfpn.academy.reliaslearning.com/</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Free Resources</span></h3> <p>NFPN offers many resources at no cost. You can find them here:<br /> <a href="http://www.nfpn.org/free-resources" target="_blank">http://www.nfpn.org/free-resources</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Your Feedback Is Important</span></h3> <p>As NFPN continues to develop training materials, we want to know what needs you have. What products and services are you looking for?</p> <p>Please take 2 minutes to answer our 1-question survey at:<br /> <a href="https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/H8TF93T" target="_blank">https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/H8TF93T</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">We’re Available</span></h3> <p>If you have any questions about NFPN’s resources or what resources would be the best fit for your agency, please contact:</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, Exec. Dir.<br /> National Family Preservation Network<br /> <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a> | 888-498-9047</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/10/08/resources-and-savings-2/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2014-10-08 13:00 +00:00 2014-10-08 06:00 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=325 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/09/17/new-resources-for-families-involved-in-substance-abuse/ IFPS Info & Resources Trauma New Resources for Families Involved in Substance Abuse A just-released brief from the State Policy Advocacy and Reform Center (SPARC) states that nationwide 11% of children live in a home where at least one parent has a substance abuse disorder. However, two-thirds of children in foster care come from homes with a parent with a substance-abusing problem. Parental substance abuse is the second &#8230; Wed, 17 Sep 2014 13:00:25 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/09/17/new-resources-for-families-involved-in-substance-abuse/#respond admin <p>A just-released brief from the State Policy Advocacy and Reform Center (SPARC) states that nationwide 11% of children live in a home where at least one parent has a substance abuse disorder. However, two-thirds of children in foster care come from homes with a parent with a substance-abusing problem. Parental substance abuse is the second highest reason for termination of parental rights.</p> <h3>What is being done to help the most vulnerable families involved in substance abuse?</h3> <p>While there is a widespread belief that treatment slots are not available, the SPARC report indicates a careful analysis reveals that as little as 5% of all treatment slots could serve all parents in the child welfare system who need it.</p> <p>Five practice innovations are being used in the child welfare system to address substance abuse:</p> <ol> <li><strong>Screening of Parents:</strong> Four states (ME, OK, Fl, NJ) have adopted universal screening methods.</li> <li><strong>Screening and Assessment of Children for the Effects of Substance Abuse:</strong> Federal law requires screening and assessment for children under age 3 and states are beginning to implement processes.</li> <li><strong>Parent Support:</strong> Recovery coaches and peer advisers are forms of parental support that are helping parents to successfully complete treatment.</li> <li><strong>Evidence-Based Programs:</strong> Celebrating Families, Strengthening Families, and PCIT are some of the recommended programs.</li> <li><strong>Training the Workforce:</strong> Over 55,000 workers have signed up for online training offered by the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare<br /> (<a href="https://www.ncsacw.samhsa.gov/training/default.aspx">https://www.ncsacw.samhsa.gov/training/default.aspx</a>).</li> </ol> <h3>Family Drug Courts</h3> <p>Family drug courts is an approach to substance abuse deserving special mention. Phil Breitenbucher, Program Director of the Center for Children and Family Futures, says that there are 346 family drug courts serving over 19,000 families nationwide. Judges created drug courts in 1995 to address substance abuse within the child welfare system.</p> <p>Compared to individual treatment systems alone, family drug courts’ positive outcomes include:</p> <ul> <li>significantly higher rates of parental participation in substance abuse treatment,</li> <li>longer stays in treatment,</li> <li>higher rates of family reunification, and</li> <li>fewer children in foster care.</li> </ul> <p>A detailed manual for developing family drug courts is available here:<br /> (PDF format, 2.4 Mb) <a href="http://bit.ly/1wm7g8m" target="_blank">http://bit.ly/1wm7g8m</a></p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Substance Abuse and Trauma</span></h3> <p>Often accompanying substance abuse is trauma. One study showed a high correlation between substance abuse disorders in women and PTSD, most commonly resulting from a history of childhood physical and sexual abuse. Parents may exhibit:</p> <ul> <li>inconsistent, irritable, explosive, or inflexible discipline;</li> <li>low supervision and involvement;</li> <li>little nurturance;</li> <li>tolerance of youth substance abuse.</li> </ul> <p>In turn, children are much more likely to be traumatized in a home with substance-abusing parents.</p> <p><strong>How can this cycle be changed?</strong></p> <p><em>Seeking Safety </em>is a therapy designed for families experiencing both substance abuse and trauma. Details are available on their website:<br /> <a href="http://www.seekingsafety.org/" target="_blank">http://www.seekingsafety.org/</a></p> <p>There are new and exciting resources that can aid families involved in substance abuse. There is hope and help for these families!</p> <p>For more information on substance abuse and trauma, view this PowerPoint presentation:<br /> (PDF format, 1.2 Mb) <a href="http://bit.ly/1uORCRP" target="_blank">http://bit.ly/1uORCRP</a></p> <p>To view the SPARC brief, visit:<br /> <a href="http://bit.ly/X7BDme" target="_blank">http://bit.ly/X7BDme</a></p> <p>For additional information on drug courts, see <em>The Judges&#8217; Page</em> newsletter, published by the National CASA Association and the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges:<br /> <a href="http://bit.ly/1nXKEFT" target="_blank">http://bit.ly/1nXKEFT</a></p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/09/17/new-resources-for-families-involved-in-substance-abuse/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2014-09-17 13:00 +00:00 2014-09-17 06:00 -07:00 http://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/?p=323 https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/preventing-child-deaths/ IFPS Info & Resources Preventing Child Deaths My sister, the youngest of five children, died from leukemia at age three. She was incredibly gifted. The first word she spoke clearly was my challenging three-syllable name: Priscilla. She recited the Pledge of Allegiance at age two. I can still recall the sound of my father sobbing behind his bedroom door as he came &#8230; Wed, 27 Aug 2014 13:00:26 Z https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/preventing-child-deaths/#respond admin <p>My sister, the youngest of five children, died from leukemia at age three.</p> <p>She was incredibly gifted. The first word she spoke clearly was my challenging three-syllable name: Priscilla. She recited the Pledge of Allegiance at age two. I can still recall the sound of my father sobbing behind his bedroom door as he came to the realization that there was no cure for the disease that was taking the life of his beloved child.</p> <p>My sister’s death had a profound impact on my family that continues to this day. It was during that time that I chose a lifelong mission of helping people.</p> <p>Child deaths are not only the result of disease. I think that the most tragic child deaths are the result of abuse and neglect. The loss of these precious little ones also has a profound impact, or should have, on all of us.</p> <h3><span class="subtitle">Eliminating Abuse and Neglect Fatalities</span></h3> <p>Some of the brightest minds understood my father’s anguish and went to work on a cure for leukemia. Today, the five-year survival rate of children with the most common type of leukemia is 90%.</p> <p>Yet over 1,500 children nationwide die each year from abuse and neglect, 70% of them under the age of three. Where are the bright minds at work to prevent these deaths?</p> <p>You may recall that several years ago the supercomputer Watson handily defeated the humans in the game of <em>Jeopardy! </em>Afterwards, the developers solicited ideas as to how this computer might be put to best use. I suggested that Watson analyze the common features of child deaths from abuse and neglect in order to develop ways to prevent them. I didn’t receive a response.</p> <p>But just when you start to lose hope, something happens! In 2012, Congress passed the <em>Protect our Kids Act. </em>One of the key provisions of the act was the establishment of the<strong> Commission to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities (CECANF)</strong>, whose mission is to develop a national strategy and recommendations for reducing fatalities across the country resulting from child abuse and neglect. It will do this by:</p> <ul> <li>raising visibility and building awareness about the problem,</li> <li>reviewing data and best practices to determine what is and is not working,</li> <li>helping to identify solutions,</li> <li>reporting on findings and making recommendations to drive future policy.</li> </ul> <p>The Commission has scheduled public meetings nationwide this year with two already held in San Antonia, Texas; and Tampa, Florida. Upcoming hearings are scheduled in Detroit, Michigan; Denver, Colorado; and Burlington, Vermont.</p> <p>In Texas, Dr. Christopher Greeley, Professor of Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, provided testimony on targeting resources to do the most good. Dr. Greeley and others collect data statewide and focus on the areas with the highest concentration of child abuse deaths.</p> <p>Here is what they’ve discovered are some contributing factors to these deaths:</p> <ul> <li>Drug/alcohol impairment at time of incident</li> <li>History of substance abuse</li> <li>Maltreatment as a child</li> <li>Domestic violence</li> </ul> <p>These are some of the prevention strategies:</p> <ul> <li>Home visitation</li> <li>Parental support programs</li> <li>Addressing maternal mental health</li> <li>Addressing household violence and substance abuse.</li> </ul> <p>It’s a collaborative approach that relies on mapping of incidents, tailoring prevention at the neighborhood level, and piloting strategies to verify benefit.</p> <p>That’s how some bright minds are working to prevent child deaths. All of us have a stake in preventing deaths from child abuse and neglect. Let’s not stop until we get the survival rate above 90%!</p> <p>To learn more about the Commission to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities, visit:<br /> <a href="https://eliminatechildabusefatalities.sites.usa.gov/" target="_blank">https://eliminatechildabusefatalities.sites.usa.gov/</a></p> <h2><span class="title">New IFPS Website</span></h2> <p>NFPN is pleased to announce a new website focusing on Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS).</p> <p>The website is a repository of knowledge on IFPS. Current activity in the field of IFPS is posted on the IFPS blog (formerly, IFPS Coast to Coast), which is now part of the IFPS website.</p> <p>Visit the website and blog at:<br /> <a href="http://www.intensivefamilypreservation.org" target="_blank">http://www.intensivefamilypreservation.org</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Priscilla Martens, Exec. Dir.<br /> National Family Preservation Network<br /> <a href="mailto:director@nfpn.org">director@nfpn.org</a> | 888-498-9047</p> https://nfpnnewsnotes.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/preventing-child-deaths/feed/ 0 ifpscoasttocoast 2014-08-27 13:00 +00:00 2014-08-27 06:00 -07:00